Can't Touch Us Now Image
Metascore
71

Generally favorable reviews - based on 7 Critics What's this?

User Score
7.1

Generally favorable reviews- based on 8 Ratings

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  • Summary: The 11th full-length studio release for the British ska pop band was produced by Clive Langer and Liam Watson.
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Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 4 out of 7
  2. Negative: 0 out of 7
  1. Oct 27, 2016
    80
    Despite the departure of original member Cathal “Chas Smash” Smyth, the elements that made Madness one of the most beloved bands of the early 1980s are intact on Can’t Touch Us Now, their first album for four years.
  2. Q Magazine
    Oct 27, 2016
    80
    Any darkness never overwhelms an album which feels as welcoming as an unscheduled drink with an old friend. [Dec 2016, p.110]
  3. Mojo
    Oct 28, 2016
    80
    It is striking how old school and immediate it sounds. [Dec 2016, p.90]
  4. Dec 12, 2016
    70
    On Can't Touch Us Now, the smarts and the songwriting are closer to the forefront, and it's a fine showcase of what they still do well.
  5. Uncut
    Oct 27, 2016
    60
    All the usual Madness fixtures are present--the jaunty ska-meets-Motown rhythms, the tricksy chromatic chord changes, the well-crafted narratives. What much of the album lacks is any kind of heart. [Dec 2016, p.32]
  6. 60
    Can’t Touch Us Now doesn’t have quite the exploratory breadth of Oui Oui Si Si Ja Ja Da Da, but there’s enough variety to animate their tableaux of social portraits.
  7. Jan 13, 2017
    50
    This isn’t the work of a group that has nothing left to say but is, instead, evidence of a group unsure of what it should say.
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 2 out of 2
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 2
  3. Negative: 0 out of 2
  1. Oct 31, 2016
    10
    "Can't Touch Us Now" is a remarkably strong, triumphant set of songs. Madness color each track with different textures and structure, from"Can't Touch Us Now" is a remarkably strong, triumphant set of songs. Madness color each track with different textures and structure, from the cool, smoldering "Don't Let Them Catch You Crying" to the hazy, electric "You Are My Everything." The songs are linked by Madness' gift for melody, and the sax and piano breaks remind you that these are indeed those same nutty boys that gave us "One Step Beyond" 37 years ago, Chris Foreman's guitar features heavily in several spots, and this adds muscle to the album, and gives Madness a fresh sound. The overall quality extends to the lyrics as well, which reflect Madness' optimism and affection for London and its inhabitants. Madness are masters of their craft, and it's no wonder that they are so beloved. There's no one like them. Expand
  2. Oct 28, 2016
    9
    Love this album. Lots of variety. Hints of the early music they used to do a plenty here. Lyrically fantastic and has those songs you can'tLove this album. Lots of variety. Hints of the early music they used to do a plenty here. Lyrically fantastic and has those songs you can't get out of your head, (ear worms my Mrs calls them). Democraticly a great album by the nutty boys. Well done chaps. Expand