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Holy Hell Image
Metascore
90

Universal acclaim - based on 8 Critic Reviews What's this?

User Score
8.8

Universal acclaim- based on 101 Ratings

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  • Summary: The eighth full-length release for the British metalcore band is its first without Tom Searle, who passed away in August 2016.
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Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 8 out of 8
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 8
  3. Negative: 0 out of 8
  1. Kerrang!
    Nov 9, 2018
    100
    An album that's by turns gut-wrenching, hauntingly desolate and emotionally devastating. [3 Nov 2018, p.57]
  2. 100
    Even aside from the tragedy that frames its arrival, though, it stands up as Architects’ very best album. ... Architects have emerged more powerful than ever--building on Tom’s legacy, rather than riding on its coattails. It’s a wonder to behold.
  3. Nov 9, 2018
    80
    The songs’ difficult birth has given them a bracing, anthemic, heartfelt and occasionally even eerily dreamlike quality. Architects aren’t a band for anyone with sensitive hearing, but it’s hard not to be moved by this loud, cathartic howl.
  4. Nov 9, 2018
    80
    Holy Hell is both a teardown and a rebuild, and while it isn't always an easy listen, there is some hard-won catharsis to be found in its attempt to distill the messiness of grief into four-minute blasts of sonic demolition.
  5. Nov 9, 2018
    80
    Holy Hell succeeds in pushing Architects’ sound further than ever before. The grooves dig deeper, while the instrumentation is techier.
  6. Q Magazine
    Nov 20, 2018
    80
    It's as an articulation of grief that this record speaks most powerfully. [Jan 2019, p.106]
  7. Nov 12, 2018
    70
    Architects have never shied away from clarion calls to action, but this is the band at their most inspiring and effectual, filling in the empty space left behind after a monumental loss. It is an epitaph that nonetheless suggests a bright future ahead.

See all 8 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 11 out of 11
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 11
  3. Negative: 0 out of 11
  1. Dec 4, 2018
    10
    It's really difficult to cope with the loss of a band member and best friend, but Architects coped with the loss of Tom Searle in the mostIt's really difficult to cope with the loss of a band member and best friend, but Architects coped with the loss of Tom Searle in the most creative and appropriate way. That shows in tracks such as 'Doomsday, 'Modern Misery' and 'Death is Not Defeat.' There is not a song I can consider bad nor even 'meh' in that standard. A really solid album from front to back. Expand
  2. Nov 14, 2018
    10
    A brutally honest return to form. Though Tom Searle is no longer with us, his music and impact carry on in what has no doubt become the bestA brutally honest return to form. Though Tom Searle is no longer with us, his music and impact carry on in what has no doubt become the best metalcore band in the scene: Architects. Expand
  3. Nov 10, 2018
    10
    Arguably their best album to date, it is a level of sonic transcendence that only Architects could provide. To manage to temper loss andArguably their best album to date, it is a level of sonic transcendence that only Architects could provide. To manage to temper loss and suffering into something that is just so well put together is a fitting tribute to Tom. It'd be hard to name a weakest track on the album, but on a level of personal taste it is probably Damnation. Strongest to choose is even harder, Death Is Not Defeat, Mortal After All and Holy Hell are all worthy contenders, but the best two must be A Wasted Hymn and Doomsday.

    Architects have surpassed themselves yet again and Sam Carter has confirmed his place among the elite vocalists of the metal world. You can almost touch the malice and hurt in his voice. Get ready for the tour in the new year, as it is not one you will forgive yourself for missing.
    Expand
  4. Jan 25, 2019
    10
    While some bands evolve in rather flimsy manner, often changing their style completely in an attempt "to find something new", ArchitectsWhile some bands evolve in rather flimsy manner, often changing their style completely in an attempt "to find something new", Architects proves once again that the genre of metalcore is not dead. Losing Tom could put a stop to the whole band, but this pain was instead used to fuel the entirety of this record. Memorable riffs, emotional singing and most importantly constant and never-stopping head banging.

    If a band "changes their sound" we can all hope they follow Architects. Without a doubt, an album of the century.
    Expand
  5. Oct 3, 2019
    10
    Best metal album of a generation, one of the best metal albums ever made. So much passion
  6. Nov 26, 2019
    10
    One of the best metalcore,that i ever heard,perfect vocal,nice lyrics and this guitar.....
  7. Nov 29, 2018
    8
    Holy Hell isn't really an Art Rock album, but it has a lot of refinement to be a Metalcore's stuff.

See all 11 User Reviews