Sputnikmusic's Scores

  • Music
For 2,072 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Bloodmoon: I
Lowest review score: 10 The Path of Totality
Score distribution:
2072 music reviews
    • 88 Metascore
    • 74 Critic Score
    30
    30 might not have been the cleanest of breakups, but it more than translates in lyrical form.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    This record holds up on its own terms, and it’s pretty enough to do well on anyone else’s.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Blood Moon I is also the heaviest and most impressive expression of Chelsea Wolfe and Ben Chrisholm's music, powered by the incombustible force of Converge and the everlasting spirit of Cave In, and resulting in one of the most impressive collaborations of this kind. Blood Moon I is, truly, an essential album for 2021.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    An Evening With Silk Sonic lives up to its billing as a true experience: it’s sexy, ever-so-smooth, and radiates confidence and charisma. ... An Evening With Silk Sonic marks the pinnacle of Bruno Mars’ and Anderson .Paak’s respective musical careers.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    The old gang is back together, and they’ve cooked up a project that’s compelling front-to-back, a clear progression on their established styles both separately and as a unit without a bad track in sight.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Red – both in its original form as well as with these welcome additions – is an absolute triumph.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    It’s encouraging to see Thrice so keen to play with different palettes at this point in their career, and they clearly have enough of their old touch left to make those critical moments count. However, if Horizons / East really represents a new dawn for the band, one can only hope that its rays penetrate a little further across its recently confirmed sequel.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It’s another impressive piece of art from the everchanging Emma Ruth Rundle, and the beginning of something entirely different from the wandering artist.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Without a doubt, it’s ‘heavier’ than past PoGs on a moment-to-moment basis, but its constituent pieces of songvomit are frequently disjointed and undeveloped to the point that you straight-up question why the band were so unwilling to dig any deeper into them.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 76 Critic Score
    Overall, Still Sucks transfers over the energy and fun from its predecessor, but at just over thirty minutes in length, they were left with very little room for errors, and unfortunately here, there are some pretty glaring ones. ... But if nothing else, it’s a decent addition to their discography.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s Marissa Nadler’s most ambitious undertaking from a lyrical perspective, but she pulls it off brilliantly while simultaneously delivering an album that sounds so lush, sweeping, and powerful that all of the subtle, intricate melodies are merely the cherry on top.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Years from now I’m sure we’ll still be returning to Lost in the Dream as The War on Drugs’ indelible classic, but that doesn’t mean that I Don’t Live Here Anymore won’t possess its own well-deserved audience.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Myth of the Happily Ever After serves as an excellent and shockingly ambitious outing from a band that seemed to be trending in all the wrong directions not long ago. With this album, they’ve reclaimed control of their story.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    Orbiting around the frivolity of human existence and overpopulation, Existence Is Futile is yet another successful chapter in a gothic horror novel that began thirty years ago. It is thus both a celebration and a testimony to the power of perseverance.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 82 Critic Score
    Radical is by no means a reinvention or revelation for the band, but I wouldn't want it to be. In refusing to fix what ain't broke, ETID prove themselves once more as the reigning king of their peculiar, blood-splattered bouncy-castle.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    Mercurial Bay is bland and overpolished and probably insecure and definitely destined to make mincemeat of fickle hearts all over the web. It is good and shiny like an overviewed but freshly refiltered Instagram photo of a Hollywood sunset.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Sticky is the very definition of throwing sh*t at the wall and seeing what sticks. Unfortunately for this album, nothing does, and all you’re left with is the horrible odour from its experimentation.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Sadly, ‘Coloratura’ is not enough to save the LP from being a mess. In the end, you can’t even say you are disappointed anymore. This is who Coldplay are now, producing the most casual music for the most casual listeners possible.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 68 Critic Score
    About two-thirds of Moral Hygiene is good and there are no tragic moments at all. In essence, the LP brings together most of what Ministry explored during the last three decades. The results are not stellar, but Jourgensen found a balance again between getting his point across and focusing on diversifying the music.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 94 Critic Score
    With furious drama, callbacks to older tracks, and references to their own unwieldy name, the band’s fourth record would make for a theatrical swan song. Lord knows the revolving door that is their lineup lends itself to an unexpected and sudden demise. The World Is, however, appear to be tighter and more focused than ever before.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    Expands on the sound she has been sculpting from her debut to the point of creating something that is unmistakably hers. You’ll read comparisons with Grouper here and there, but I can assure you this operates on another level.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    The lethal grindcore squad hits ten with this new release engrossing a catalogue that knows no missteps just yet. If hell is what you want, hell is what you'll receive. In abundance.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The result isn’t moving, per se, but it is at its best affecting and warm (Reach Out, The Pillar of Souls and Cimmerian Shade exemplify the record at its most beautiful, for my money). ... Interestingly, the duo save their best - and their most experimental - until the final two tracks.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 74 Critic Score
    All in all, Bright Magic is one more solid entry into the duo's catalogue.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Conquering does nothing genuinely new, and that’s genuinely okay. The basics are the basics for a reason and, as Employed to Serve demonstrate, executing them with passion and precision is sometimes all that you need.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    What these artists have pulled together in their last outing as a trio is something more than the sum of its parts, a paradoxical masterpiece that lies somewhere in the space between, blindingly bright and painfully incomprehensible.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    The songwriting here is too good to deny, and its shortcomings are merely down to personal preferences. If you’re looking for a well-made rock album with all the pop and punk trimmings, look no further than Lifeforms.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    From Dreams to Dust packs all the wit, creativity, and emotionally compelling depth that you'd expect from a band leading the country/Americana charge - until now, we just didn't know that band was The Felice Brothers.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Except for the last two somewhat average songs, this is an accomplished work that defies canons without ever truly dazzling.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The maturity and class displayed here is a pleasant surprise (which has nothing to do with Musgraves, and everything to do with divorce/breakup album stereotypes), and the experience is unexpectedly serene given the music's content and overarching themes, but otherwise star-crossed is merely nice: a lukewarm batch of songs eager to saturate backgrounds rather than absorb your full attention.