Shore Image
Metascore
87

Universal acclaim - based on 19 Critic Reviews What's this?

User Score
8.8

Universal acclaim- based on 102 Ratings

Your Score
0 out of 10
Rate this:
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 1
  • 0
  • 0
  • Summary: The surprise release of the fourth full-length album for the indie folk band led by Robin Pecknold was recorded in California, New York and Paris, France.
Buy Now
Buy on
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 19 out of 19
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 19
  3. Negative: 0 out of 19
  1. Mojo
    Oct 28, 2020
    100
    The vital spark that graced Fleet Foxes' debut is back. [Dec 2020, p.80]
  2. Uncut
    Oct 16, 2020
    90
    Robin Pecknold's ruminations on ageing and loss are a soothing balm in uncertain times. [Dec 2020, p.29]
  3. Sep 29, 2020
    85
    It is him following a path of lesser resistance through the landscape, writing actual choruses and melodic hooks, and finding that there is just as much natural brilliance and artistic merit to approaching his work in this manner.
  4. Sep 22, 2020
    80
    All in all, it’s a beautiful record – and one that bears repeated plays. I’ve been playing it for around 10 days now, mostly on headphones, and it’s still revealing new details with each listen.
  5. Sep 25, 2020
    80
    Shore finds them exploring vaster range than before. No longer do they sound burdened by the need to commit to a particular mood; Pecknold sounds freer than ever to be himself.
  6. 80
    It’s maturer in sound and ideas, but retains all the hallmarks of what made Fleet Foxes so great in the first place: rich and studied folk compositions, unrivalled harmonies, stories that strike to the core of nature and human existence, and a dedication to art that emotionally lifts you off this planet.
  7. Sep 30, 2020
    70
    The material as a whole is mellow and gentle on the ears. This is the Pacific Coast, not the boardwalks of New Jersey.

See all 19 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 23 out of 26
  2. Negative: 0 out of 26
  1. Sep 26, 2020
    10
    Wonderful album. Combination of the complexity of Crack Up with the accessibility of their debut. Highly recommended.
  2. Sep 23, 2020
    10
    Stunning! This is an awesome album all the way through. I'm loved Robin Pecknold's incredible vocals and soaring melodies, they felt like aStunning! This is an awesome album all the way through. I'm loved Robin Pecknold's incredible vocals and soaring melodies, they felt like a hug in these difficult times. I feel like it's a step up from crack up which I enjoyed but didn't love. Expand
  3. Sep 22, 2020
    10
    A great experience that I'll heard over and over again. Way ahead of its time!
  4. Sep 23, 2020
    9
    Listen with headphones & find yourself in the organic rich layers of beauty. Honestly, the best album of 2020 and I will leave out “so far”.Listen with headphones & find yourself in the organic rich layers of beauty. Honestly, the best album of 2020 and I will leave out “so far”.

    Amazing work Robin
    Expand
  5. Sep 24, 2020
    8
    I am heartened that Robin has decided to move away from all the perplexing heaviness and sometimes distressingly abstruse sound characterisingI am heartened that Robin has decided to move away from all the perplexing heaviness and sometimes distressingly abstruse sound characterising songs in "Crack-up". This is a much more accessible, for the lack of a better word, record than the last one, easier in approach and more immediate, and hence, engaging in nature. Many tracks in this album lean towards a modern rock-pop sound, with a lot fewer folkish elements relative to their debut album, and some unexpected sprinklings of trumpet and synths here and there. Although the highlights from this album, such as the adventurous synth-preceded "Jara", "Can I Believe You" with its monumental choral bed sound and meaningful rumination on trust, and "Sunblind", a delightfully breezy and pastoral tribute lionizing Robin's influences, do not evoke the same creative rapture, magical landscapes and emotional highs as tracks like "White Winter Hymnal", "Ragged Wood", "Blue Ridge Mountains" and "Mykonos" of their debut 'Fleet Foxes', their best album in my books, this one is still very winsome. The outro portion of "Cradling Mother, Cradling Woman", with its relentless yet euphoric, trumpeting cascade caught my attention and rekindled my faith in the band's capacity for affecting inventiveness. I also found myself liking a few of Robin's more novel ideas, like the last quarter of "Going-to-the-Sun Road" where the synths and trumpets enter as a riveting backdrop to some tender Portuguese soliloquy delivered expectantly by, to my surprise, a male - not female - Brazilian singer by the name of Tim Bernardes. It would have been a stellar track through and through, in my humble opinion, if only the first half of the track didn't meander for a bit. More exactly, some songs fall flat in their execution with great ideas not being fleshed out fully.

    That said, there is not one track here that succeeds in completely transporting me to a different realm of imagination or offering an otherworldly, almost spiritual, listening experience like "White Winter Hymnal" does for me. I have been pining for years, in hopes that they would one day produce a track like that, i.e. "White Winter Hymnal", replete with some of the most amazing vocal build-ups, vocal harmonies, melodic identity and breadth of instrumental textures. That one song was put together so immaculately and sets the bar so high, I reckon it would be one that Robin finds hard-pressed to beat. Nevertheless, I am thankful for as long as he's still producing enjoyable music like this record, despite not necessarily being extraordinarily memorable like their debut, and that he is doing things that makes his career an enjoyable and sustainable one for him.

    It is rather amusing to note that there are others who feel the same way as me about the relative success of Robin's recent efforts. I can definitely see where they are coming from, as my thoughts do resonate with them as a long-time follower of the band. They have expressed their thoughts in a tactful manner, but all of them seemed to have been downvoted by arguably blind or very new followers to the band's discography. It is important to note that this album is invariably a delectable fruit of Robin's labor, notwithstanding the fact that there are areas deserving of criticism.

    Incidentally, if you enjoy "Sunblind", I will suggest you check out the band's cover of the Bee Gee's "In the Morning". The vibes given off by the latter track is not quite unlike the former, and there is an undeniably pastoral charm to both of them.
    Expand
  6. Dec 28, 2020
    8
    Anyone who became a Fleet Foxes fan probably found them on there debut or EP album and have looked for anything to bring them back to thatAnyone who became a Fleet Foxes fan probably found them on there debut or EP album and have looked for anything to bring them back to that beautiful feel of melodies and feeling that those albums created. While this is not as fulfilling as the debut album it is surprisingly close to recreating the the original with its own (new) soothing feel and takes the positives from the lesser albums to make a new but beautifully balanced album all in itself. Expand
  7. Sep 23, 2020
    5
    Doesn't seem as genuine, inventive or in the moment as their first two albums, no hooks or harmonies, vocals and lyrics are lost in theDoesn't seem as genuine, inventive or in the moment as their first two albums, no hooks or harmonies, vocals and lyrics are lost in the instruments, different production to their first two albums, ended up quite flat. Disappointed. Expand

See all 26 User Reviews

Related Articles

  1. The 40 Best Albums of 2020

    The 40 Best Albums of 2020 Image
    Published: December 24, 2020
    We reveal the 40 highest-scoring album releases of the year, as well as some of 2020's bests and worsts in other music categories.