Consequence's Scores

For 3,885 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Coloring Book [Mixtape]
Lowest review score: 0 Revival
Score distribution:
3885 music reviews
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Opeth’s chemistry feels as tight as it is playful, heartfelt as it is engaging, as they explore a plethora of intriguing and majestic sounds. The instrumentation and vocals, in both versions, serve to present emotion and instrumental wonder. In Cauda Venenum is among Opeth’s strongest albums when it comes to the band’s progressive sensibilities.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    With Jaime, Howard proves what many of us already speculated: The magic behind Alabama Shakes was Brittany Howard.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    While one could argue Lord-Alge’s mix brought the band their first Billboard Hot 100 hit in “I’ll Be You”, time has proven that hit didn’t really bring them any long-term success. By scaling back then, Wallace has created an album that truly fits with their narrative, and that’s probably worth more now than then. After all, time has been very kind to The Replacements, who continue to build upon their legacy with each passing year, and Dead Man’s Pop is a welcome addition.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Though House of Sugar can be a difficult record, those who take the time to delve into its layers will be treated to a piece that captures the modern psyche in a way few other pieces of art manage to do.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Some reunions suck; others are a relief simply because they’re not embarrassing. Vivian Girls have defied the odds by reuniting for their best album yet.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Blink-182’s second album with Matt Skiba is ultimately subpar, weighed down by stereotypical lyrics and cloying choruses. Producers John Feldmann and Tim Pagnotta’s heavy use of compression makes NINE as in-your-face as possible, not giving the songs the necessary breathing room to develop without overproduction.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Gallagher embraces acceptance on a deeper level with this album than we’ve seen before; he’s game for going all in on “Now That I’ve Found You”, but he also displays the power of reflection on “Once” and “Alright Now”.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The good news is that her songwriting is stronger than ever. Along with co-executive producer A.G. Cook, Charli XCX has put together a delightful album of high-end pop confections. Charli packs in plenty of wow and proves to be more than worth the wait.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    A collection of mostly good — a few forgettable and a clutch of very good — songs you have no reason to know. But the last couple albums were reminders not to take your faves for granted, and if they continue on this path, they might even win over some Pixies fans.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    There are incredibly emotional moments throughout the record, really driving the anger and sadness of the music. Some songs lack depth and don’t land as well as others, but, overall, The Nothing remains an emotionally potent experience that longtime fans of Korn will enjoy.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The finish is messy, the mixing hops from decade to decade, and the album flow is nonexistent. There are a couple of great moments, especially “Rubberband”. But without those finer touches, it often doesn’t even sound like Miles Davis, just some dude blowing a horn.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    It will be a surprise to learn which tracks aren’t singles yet; there’s at least five more hits to be spawned from this thing, and we’ll never hear the end of it.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The music carries the listener throughout each track, making for a meditative experience. With Birth of Violence, Chelsea Wolfe offers a compelling work brimming with emotion and dreamy wonder.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Each voice is allowed to shine here, and through them, the voices of so many women who continually find themselves stifled in the country music format.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    It’s a late-career entry that can’t hold up to his priceless back catalog, but it’s also the work of a guy who at this point really couldn’t give a shit what people think. You’ll enjoy some tracks and soldier through others. But Iggy’s still here, and maybe that’s the most important takeaway of all.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Offering sanctuary to anyone with a soul full of longing, At the Party with My Brown Friends is a beautiful affirmation of our common needs and a reminder that love is possible.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Norman Fucking Rockwell! proves (again) Del Rey as a fully-realized artist who has remained true to her obsessions — aesthetic, cultural, and personal — outlasting the misogynist criticisms that could have derailed her early career. Del Rey delivers a gaze that swivels internally and externally, that can simultaneously observe our national existential dread and her own sudden hope for a “Hallmark” love.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Ehrlich and Kakacek are perfectly in tune with each other, evoking ache and yearning on every note. If the record is not as immediately grabbing as Light Upon the Lake, it’s because it’s a slow burn, driven by a deep desire that blooms into a heart-wrenching splendor.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Fear Inoculum lives up to its daunting expectations with songs that showcase Tool in peak performance as musicians and compositional arrangers. For the diehard fan, there’s a lot to consume here. Likewise, the album offers little respite for the uninitiated; its accessibility comes in the form of its vastness and eerie psychedelia, not through hooks or common pop structures. This is deep prog-rock as only Tool can create it.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    While Farrar’s restlessness seems authentic, he sometimes gives the impression of someone who’s lost track of himself, barking truths so obvious that they fall flat when said aloud. Still, Spirit World rewards repeat listens, a dense full-length on which a band with an ever-shifting identity finds a firm foothold, at least for now.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Twelve Nudes makes all the moves some of us have wanted from Furman: faster, brisker music, clearer politics, bigger riffs, and impossible-to-ignore shouting. It feels a couple highlights short of a punk classic, but it’s the follow-up that last year’s excellent Transangelic Exodus probably deserves.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Since GINGER contains more fresh ideas than almost every great rap album of 2019 combined, once again it’s hard to pin down why it feels like such a relief when it finally ends, why traditional technicians like Dababy and Megan Thee Stallion and their fellow hype-turning-institution, Cardi B feel like they deliver more satisfying fulfillment of what they promise.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    The maturation through Taylor Swift’s career has also shown her react to personal change in real time. ... Maturity for Taylor Swift means shrugging off what isn’t worth a fight, looking inward rather than blaming others, and being able to admit when you were wrong.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    While the album may be directly compared to 2017’s Murder of the Universe, it’s arguably the most straightforward material they’ve written in some time. And while it feels like a minor misstep in comparison to much of their catalog, it finds the band crafting forceful and ferocious, mosh pit-friendly rippers that are politically and socially relevant.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The record and its seamless transitions from one heavily enticing, tender, and softly delivered track to the next paints a captivating and enthralling self-portrait.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    So Much Fun succeeds in its quest to highlight the success of Young Thug; almost all of the 19 tracks could stand alone as a strong demonstration of what Thug does best, but they also work together to create a cohesive project.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    A Distant Call finds Sheer Mag growing in terms of their palette, thundering with confidence in their ability as musicians as well as their beliefs. Luckily, they don’t linger too much in the details of the overarching story line, treating the narrative as a vehicle for the songs rather than the other way around.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Atonement is an emotionally compelling record that explores concepts of finding strength in one’s being. Between the raw intensity of the instrumentation and vocals, as well as the inspirational elements throughout each song, Killswitch Engage offer a very solid addition to their discography.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Not every experiment on This Is Not a Safe Place succeeds, but that’s okay; failures still signify work in progress, and we can all agree that a world in which Ride’s at work is always preferable to the alternative.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Face Stabber stands as arguably Oh Sees’ most mature and nuanced work to date, and as evidenced by this album, the band is riding a steep, upward trajectory that has continued for an astonishing period of time.