The Wire's Scores

  • Music
For 2,213 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 SMiLE
Lowest review score: 10 Amazing Grace
Score distribution:
2213 music reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An unpretentious work of Romanticism - that holds space for the infinite experience imbued in a poem, a song, or a voice. [May 2021, p.55]
    • The Wire
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    When you listen to Made Out Of Sound, you feel encouraged to immerse yourself in every note, cherishing the beauty of this otherworldly space. [Apr 2021]
    • The Wire
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The ten tracks are built on foundations of looped percussion and tight bass sequences, usually based around short, sharp and undeclarative sounds – synthetic rimshots and damped hi-hats rather than snares or kicks. While this can run into staid territory, as on the triphop shuffle of “One Two”, for the most part its subdued hardness accents the drift of Milton’s vocals. His delivery often overwhelms the matter of his lyrics in the best way. [Apr 2021, p.54]
    • The Wire
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The result is a kind of lo-fi dream music, sea-changed and composite, with whisper-core mbalax drifting in and out focus between vaporous synth washes, low-key beat programming, spoken teachings and lilting song. [Feb 2021, p.61]
    • The Wire
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Carti’s voice here sounds rough and occasionally hoarse. His famed knack for repeating phrases ad infinitum seems to lead into cul-de-sacs, and the rumbling PC beats don’t float as easily as his earlier work. But there’s plenty to appreciate on Whole Lotta Red. [Feb 2021, p.61]
    • The Wire
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    There may only be nine tracks here, but it’s like there are worlds upon worlds to explore; Strom had a knack for making every note feel special. [Feb 2021, p.55]
    • The Wire
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Across these tracks, the searching spirit of Virginia Wing is often challenged, its questions far from being answered – but the album feels more true to life because of it. [Feb 2021, p.56]
    • The Wire
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    McCartney’s infamous whimsy tempered by his refreshed penchant for odd sonic detail (the spectral guitar tangles that trail through “Find My Way” for instance) and an aged voice whose natural erosion is more feature than fault. [Feb 2021, p.58]
    • The Wire
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Audet’s obfuscatory impulses only make the album more compelling. [Feb 2021, p.58]
    • The Wire
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Yol
    Altın Gün’s unwavering commitment to Turkish psychedelic rock receives a glossy refurbishment here. [Feb 2021, p.60]
    • The Wire
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s powerful music for open roads and endless dreaming; once it’s turned on, time is suspended by the limitless layers of unbridled, electric sound. [Feb 2021, p.54]
    • The Wire
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    AAI
    The speech modelling software used to articulate the narrative generates a somewhat grittier, odder voice than your average online speech synthesizer, but that doesn’t keep the album’s expository moments from being momentum killers. The passages where artificial voice gets fed into some typically squelchy MOM electro beats are considerably more fun to listen to. [Feb 2021, p.52]
    • The Wire
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    These days, addressing race and gender in doom metal is considered extreme in itself; with Gas Lit, the duo demonstrate that extremity is not just found through deftly executed blastbeats and downtuned riffs, but within the decision to create music that defies categorisation. [Feb 2021, p.46]
    • The Wire
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The aforementioned “Carpathian Darkness” is an archetype for the album as a whole, thoroughly captivating despite (or because) of its familiarity. [Feb 2021, p.46]
    • The Wire
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Compact but effective EP release. “Mandrill” buzzes with metallic heft and 8-bit zips; “Capuchin” breaks into a melody that practically bounces. Gore is obviously having fun here. [Mar 2021, p.63]
    • The Wire
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Isles offers multiple reboots of the “Glue” formula: chunky broken beats, keening voices in many languages, and duvet-warm basslines, as on lead singles “Atlas” and “Apricots”; the latter is based around a clip of the much sampled Bulgarian State Television choir. Guest vocalist Clara La San adds a femme-pop twist to “Saku” and a tight electro jam called “X” which is the best of the bunch. [Mar 2021, p.61]
    • The Wire
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Pick A Day To Die pieces together Sunburned fragments dating back to the late 2000s, resulting in an endearing zigzag of moods. [Mar 2021, p.58]
    • The Wire
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Sound Ancestors is a masterpiece. The 16 pieces not only expand the conversation around the art of sampling, but also further hiphop’s ability to grow as a collaborative Black artform. [Mar 2021, p.54]
    • The Wire
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    On “Pure GreyCircle” Malliagh intensifies the mixture, introducing slabs of bass tone that flex and squeeze against elusive beats. There’s some weird subject matter, too; across polished surfaces and sharp corners, tracks such as “Sylph Fossil” and “Zones U Can’t See” smuggle cosmic lyrics inside voices that whisper or glide, always diving below the mix or spinning above. [Apr 2021, p.66]
    • The Wire
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The presence of these co-conspirators empowers the songs, but some of the duets are more straightforwardly fun. [Apr 2021, p.64]
    • The Wire
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Tomahawk – a band that have very much prided themselves on their messiness and incoherency – have made perhaps their most cogent record yet. [Apr 2021, p.64]
    • The Wire
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A seductive and persuasive look at the lives and human struggles those in power would rather you ignored and disdained. Get connected. [Apr 2021, p.62]
    • The Wire
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The material on the album is a constellation of soft and fragile connections between intangible forms of rock. ... Juana Molina moves “Al Sur” with propulsive singing and electronic rhythms, making the song her own before “Into Love Again” brings this lovely album full circle with a Yann Tiersenlike folk ballad. [Apr 2021, p.60]
    • The Wire
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Legacy + is a unique intergenerational conversation on wax. Both halves are set in Afrobeat, while one sticks more to the tradition than the other, and the contrast is beautiful to hear. [Apr 2021, p.58]
    • The Wire
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Promises doesn’t always come across like a true meeting of equals. Laswell used the saxophonist as a plug-in element in the late 90s, Michael Mantler’s Jazz Composer’s Orchestra did the same on 1968’s Communications, and there’s a bit of that feel here. A player with as unique and instantly recognisable a voice as Sanders always risks becoming a gimmick, but his performance here is stunningly beautiful, and the album would be unimaginable without him. [Apr 2021, p.57]
    • The Wire
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Boiling down the complexities and contradictions of the countryside to a succession of stiff choral hymns, a chance to understand and connect is lost. [Apr 2021, p.55]
    • The Wire
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The combination of simple but taut musicality and literate lyricism is a winning one. [Apr 2021, p.54]
    • The Wire
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The sound sources themselves are not of intrinsic importance – it’s what the musicians do with them that matters – but in opening up these questions, these wonderings, Under~Between does much to create its imaginative worlds. [Apr 2021, p.51]
    • The Wire
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Song Of Co-Aklan is a more than welcome return from a puckish master of social observation and surreal manifesto: “Let’s Flood The Fairground” indeed. It isn’t a consoling album and its humour is biting at best, but as a way of getting through a bruised and confused new spring, it’s the perfect companion. [Apr 2021, p.52]
    • The Wire
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Fading out, they leave the impression of an album too ambitious for its own good, but offering moments of real awe. [Apr 2021, p.52]
    • The Wire