Pretty Much Amazing's Scores

  • Music
For 295 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 60% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 38% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 M B V
Lowest review score: 0 Xscape
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 11 out of 295
295 music reviews
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This is a new My Bloody Valentine and it is excellent.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The vast majority of The Next Day is vibrant, even delirious, roaring with Bowie’s heaviest rockers and teeming with guitar hooks that just beg to be lovingly re-appropriated by James Murphy.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Nothing feels out-of-place or out-of-sync, everything clicks together in flourishes of simple brilliance.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It took exuberance, painstaking detail, and wide-eyed nostalgia for Daft Punk to create Random Access Memories, their best.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Kanye West doesn’t give the listener a second to realize the album is more a masterly response to a masterpiece than a masterpiece itself. With one sweep of the hand, West brushes away expectations. And then he sticks you squarely across the face
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Rival Dealer is only three tracks long but it’s as rich as many LPs.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The sparse musical arrangements and haunting production only serve to heighten the album’s intimacy and ultimately render it a masterpiece of reflection and introspection, destined to be played on repeat in scores of late-night, tired, and lonely rooms.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Annie Clark stands astride St. Vincent, a colossus in total--and thrilling--command.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This is music that operates at full force at all times.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    While Are We There can be taxing at points, by its end, you’ll be overcome by the feeling that you’ve shared in something profound.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    LP1
    Twigs’ superb vocal melodies anchor LP1’s flights of experimentation. Were they to be stripped from the album’s bizarre flourishes and dropped into a commercial R&B context, they would stun nonetheless.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Torres is an album that is pulsating with life.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Woman works because it balances restraint and candor, presenting love in neither a chaste nor debauched light. Milosh, through his gossamer vocals, delivers a message of stunning clarity: despite the risk, love is beautiful.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    An album where the reminiscence of rock is revitalized by The Men’s gift of genre hybridization.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    They have crafted a sound that is new for them and unique in its context, but that falls neatly into what we have come to expect from a trio whose power and creativity runs consistently unchecked.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    What truly makes Ultramarine penetrate beyond the passé realm of feel-good electropop, are the subliminal hints of evanescent existence scattered amidst the stardust.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    It is not a return to form, because how could we expect or want it to be? It is a return to the contextually avant-garde, and for Deerhunter in 2013 that means rock n’ roll.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Savages’ smart reorganization and shuffling of punk, post-punk, krautrock, and noise music into something brutal, jarringly confrontational, and completely singular is a breath of fresh air and an unignorable statement of power and resistance.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    A collection of remarkable songs by a group of musicians that compliment one another as well as any group over the last decade.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Once I Was an Eagle is a singular achievement: a haunting record, peopled with aural ghosts that come gradually crawling from out of the grooves.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    It’s the duo’s most sinister and fascinating collection of songs, enrapturing the listener with dystopian soundscapes and frustrating arrangements.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    After Dark 2 is a confirmation of his prowess and vision. It is proof and testament that the reignited flame of Italo-disco can endure through the tempests of shifting tastes.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    It is by no means comfortable, but it results in an album that is experienced rather than simply listened to.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Volcano Choir’s second album is filled with memorable hooks, hummable melodies and arena-worthy choruses.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Sonically, his oeuvre has bridged the divide between barren and lush. Lyrically, he has perfected the motif of narcotized horror.... This is the real deal.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    This is an enthralling, stunning, deeply emotive album that perfectly marries understated electronica to sublime vocals and melodies.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    It simultaneously respects and warps electronic machines, making for an ideal entry point into the disparate segments of digital life: the horrifying as well as the beautiful.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    This is music that moves the body along with the spirit, a damn fine step in the right direction.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Old
    One thing you should never underestimate, though, is the power of a good story, and Danny Brown has a wealth of them, which makes Old not just the best hip-hop album of the year--but a major factor in every discussion of album of the year.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    For anyone who can appreciate emotional breadth that music is capable of conveying, make Wild Light a part of your life. It may be the best instrumental album you hear this year.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Beyoncé waited for the last moment to unveil 2013′s finest pop album. It arrived too late to enter our top ten lists, but just in time to own the year.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    With their latest album SJDK give the people what they want, even if they didn’t know how much they wanted it.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Ghettoville’s return to some of the musical qualities of its 2008 predecessor gives new richness and power to Actress’s work.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Each spin offers a chance for escape, but what endows Berglund’s sophomore effort with the glow of a masterpiece is its accessibility.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Morning Phase never sounds anything less than opulent.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The album thrums with vitality and elation.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    To Be Kind is a loving ode to chaos, full of deranged, mutant energy and even more brilliant for it.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Do It Again is foremost a marvel of mood and pacing. The trio doles out their riches with utmost care.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Deep Fantasy is an exceptionally produced collection--really, it’s probably the finest recording job you’ll hear on a rock album this year.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Ultraviolence, a collection of mid-century ballads spiked with blues-rock, is a stunning accomplishment. Its eleven songs whimper and howl, soothe and taunt, hypnotize and thrill.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Though it never quite comes through crystal-clear, the intensity and sincerity of the underlying emotion manages to bleed through a confusing swirl of altered sounds.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Shabazz Palaces are often as mystifying as they are mind-bending, but they’re in a class all their own.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    They Want My Soul is the sort of mid-career album promising young bands should aspire to, and long-established acts will come to resent.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    It takes him--and the listener--way out of the comfort zone, a shift that suits his tendencies wonderfully.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Richard D. James has successfully crafted one of the most stunning records of his career, and he did so by exercising a deft amount of self-control.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    It is this cycle of futility and human effort that makes Hummingbird so compelling, and so much more rewarding the second time around
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    With We Are The 21st Century Ambassadors of Peace and Magic, Foxygen is a breath of fresh air, reviving a vintage style of songwriting in a new and creative fashion.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    FIDLAR will make you want to pound a case of the cheapest beer you can find with these guys, it’ll make you want to crank it up as loud as it will go in whichever of your friends’ cars.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Under the wing of producer Kevin McMahon, the duo was able to flesh out arrangements and let their music mature.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    II
    With II, UMO remains humble in composition and production, creating an honest album that comforts in the strangest ways.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    AMOK is a surprisingly unassuming album in that way; each song has worthwhile hooks and accessibility is favored over abstract experiments.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The vocals on You’re Nothing, however, are much more emotive and indicative of a newfound acknowledgement of the singer’s vulnerability as a frontman. The result is anything but sappy.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Beach Fossils have delivered an album of shimmering guitars and an ebulliently bouncy rhythm that is simply a beautiful listen.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    It grows beyond its deeply emotional roots, to become whatever you want it to be.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Youth Lagoon’s sophomore record stands tall and sure-footed.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    What makes Cerulean Salt so enjoyable and so endlessly relistenable is that some of her snapshots likely resemble ones from your own lost photo albums.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Overgrown is not the enigma that was his debut, but rather it is a first-rate album from a musician that isn’t all that interested in being enigmatic.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Judicious use of the skip button to find the tracks on which Andersson’s transfixing voice is front and center, results in a much more rewarding, immediate experience.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Beam along with producer Brian Deck and a host of musicians including members from Dylan’s band, The Tin Hat Trio and Antony and Johnsons, Iron and Wine continues this evolution by crafting a lush album of AM radio pop—complete with funk and jazz grooves.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    As an album set out to reappropriate pop rock, MCII succeeds.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Flawless transitions are endemic to the record, and necessary in order to cram this many ideas into an attention-deficit 32 minutes.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    As an entity, Obsidian is neither more nor less accessible than Cerulean. Ultimately, your mood as a listener--and perhaps the weather--will dictate how often you’ll return to Obsidian‘s bleak and beautiful world.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Ultimately Cold Spring Fault Less Youth is a fascinating record, a series of varied and elaborate soundscapes that find the right balance of mood and melody.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Camera Obscura are old enough to know what they’re are capable of, and they do it passionately and with a practiced hand.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Fanned by an intelligent approach to production, Disclosure’s fire has started to burn, and is destined to whip itself into an inferno this year.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    What Avalanche may lack in immediacy, it makes up for with the gloss and professionalism that coats each of its songs like a gossamer gown. The quality of Hannibal’s handiwork and the sheer passion of Coco’s vocals speak for themselves.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Acid Rap is the summer action blockbuster of mixtapes, where the audience need not dig much deeper than the surface to enjoy the best of what the production has to offer.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    For Sigur Rós, Kveikur is their most gloves-off release to date and they land the punch.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Making music this fuzzy and wonderful is a notable feat. Making tunes that make you want to jump into a time-travelling DeLorean and materialise in yester-year, desperate to reenact the same wanton mistakes that you made the first time round? That’s a real achievement.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Olympia inhabits a strange realm of saturnine electronica meant for cathartic swaying rather than choreographed movement.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    As Speedy Ortiz prove here, sometimes it takes insightful, clever and slightly juvenile truths built upon a wall of screeching, occasionally discordant pop to have a good time.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Though Body Music contains only one true misfire (the immediately forgettable “Kaleidoscope Love”), the album’s strongest tracks glow so bright that fine songs such as “Diver,” “Lost and Found” and “Bad Idea” can get lost in their shadow, at least on early listens.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The songs are intricately built but they also feel distinctly impermanent; little snippets of soft static open and close a number of tracks, like the songs are coming in and out focus.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    It does not need your analysis. It only wants to be listened to in order to convince you, with its sweeping aural dreamscapes, that Postiljonen can hold their own among the heavyweights.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    This is a staggering return to form for the Glaswegian quartet, the sound of Franz Ferdinand coming home after a four year long absence--with the right thoughts, the right words, and the right album.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Doris displays some of those growing pains, but it also delivers a uniquely impressive collection of vicious beats and lyrics that make Magna Carta...Holy Grail sound like Marky Mark.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Marshall’s lyrics are desolate and vehement, but McDonald does a solid job of ensuring that the instrumentation acts as a foil to the bleakness when necessary, providing a counter-redeeming edge to the desolation.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    For the most part, Silver Gymnasium makes for an uplifting and triumphant listen, with a positive energy running through the music and the melodies.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    AM
    They’ve evolved certain factors of their sound and ventured into new territory, but AM is not so much a change of direction as it is an affirmation of all the musical elements that made the band exhilarating to begin with--inspired lyrics, screeching riffs and great melodies.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The Electric Lady is mostly a classic R&B and soul album, sprinkled with some torchy jazz and gospel, and a star-dusting of Ziggy-era Bowie.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    It’s rare that a record comes along that so boldly states its own greatness, and it’s rarer still that such an album actually lives up to that promise. Wise Up Ghost does.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    CHVRCHES have constructed a debut record that will not lose its luster with each successive spin, and proven that they have the substance to remain aloft as their cosmic kin come crashing down to Earth.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The fuse has been lit. London is just a prologue, but it’s an exceedingly promising one.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Not quite the panacea that will usher in world peace, Days Are Gone is still a remarkable effort.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Sure, there may be a shorter classic buried somewhere within the project’s 145+ minutes. Alas, this mythical album merely exists in my mind. 2 of 2, however, comes tantalizingly close to that ideal on its own.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    More than ever, Willner’s own soul is put on display through his repurposing of sound, and what results is both synthetic and organic, both detailed and blurry, further cementing The Field’s reputation in the electronic ether.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    What the band still manages to do so well is use aural snippets from a range of contrasting but conventional sources, weave them together and still sound like no one else out there.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Psychic’s gloriously protracted exhales leave you no choice but to slow down and move at its pace.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    My Name Is My Name is as strong a “debut” full length as anyone could hope to produce, and reminds the world why it fell in love with this coke-rap wizard more than ten years ago.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The result is a record that stands at the crossroads between assurance and insecurity. In the hands of lesser artists, this dichotomy would be an obstacle to surmount, but for Ørsted the disparate strands of her identity combine like a binary chemical cocktail and ignite into something dangerously and delicately sublime.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Lady Gaga’s utter lack of self-restraint sets ARTPOP apart from her earlier work (ruminate on that for a moment).
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    This album is powerful, occasionally transcendent, always honest and never less than entertaining.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Frankly, it’s a bit of a corker.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Too True proves that Dum Dum Girls are as relevant today as they were six years ago because they know that evolution is the key to survival. This is their sound, the sound of today, and they wear it well.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Marissa Nadler’s limnetic new album, July, is both eerie and soothing, a lullaby written to induce nightmares.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    I’m hearing summer thunderstorms that threaten to wash the world away for two minutes then quit and get another beer. Dupuis’s bittersweet, teasing vocals feel like the gorgeous, blue, and brutally cold day after it snows three feet.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Present Tense may be a less accessible offering from Wild Beasts, but it’s their most human--a mesmeric bundle of contradictions, indignities and pleasures.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Blank Project never aims for luxuriance. Neneh Cherry instead undertakes-- and nails--a riskier feat: a reflection on midlife that sounds both wise and inventive.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    With Cilvia Demo, Rashad proves his place in the Californian crew’s lauded lineup, and TDE show their own versatility on the cusp of hip hop takeover.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    With each album Real Estate has sharpened this process, making Atlas both immediately recognizable and their most interesting album to date.