Erase Me Image
Metascore
72

Generally favorable reviews - based on 4 Critics What's this?

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6.8

Generally favorable reviews- based on 10 Ratings

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  • Summary: Produced by Matt Squire, the first full-length studio release in eight years for the Florida post-hardcore band features the addition of expletives (it no longer identifies itself as a Christian band) and the return of Aaron Gillespie, who was last heard on 2008's Lost In The Sound Of Separation.
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Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 2 out of 4
  2. Negative: 0 out of 4
  1. Apr 5, 2018
    80
    Erase Me can be considered yet another radical shift in the band's lifetime of variation, a risk that pays off with an open mind and open ears.
  2. Apr 5, 2018
    80
    Yes, Erase Me also features more singing and less metalcore than has been standard in Underoath's career, but it straddles Sleepwave's experimentations, landing on the catchier side ("Rapture," "Wake Me"), more energetic side ("It Has to Start Somewhere," "Hold Your Breath") or somehow pushing both extremes ("In Motion," "Sink With You").
  3. Apr 5, 2018
    60
    Their very best songs would see the light and the dark clashing within the same structure, every member's different interpretation of what the band could be fighting for dominance in an exhilarating rush. The major difference on Erase Me is that the two sides are in harmony, cleaned up and smoothed out and repackaged for a digestible listen.
  4. Kerrang!
    Apr 5, 2018
    60
    Erase Me is not a perfect record, but it is a solid statement from a band who believe they still gave unfinished business to attend to. [7 Apr 2018, p.53]
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 5 out of 7
  2. Negative: 1 out of 7
  1. Apr 6, 2018
    10
    It's different than people were hoping for, but that isn't a negative thing, This feels like the logical progression for Underoath. There'sIt's different than people were hoping for, but that isn't a negative thing, This feels like the logical progression for Underoath. There's heavy songs, melodic songs, punk-ish songs. This album has so many different things going on and I love it. I'd put this album right up there with all the best of Underoath's discography . Expand
  2. Apr 6, 2018
    10
    Metalcore needed this album! great comeback. A hard & catchy album that bring you back in the Underoath golden age era. Great Work
  3. Apr 13, 2018
    8
    I've been listening to Erase Me for the past week, and after much thought, my initial opinions of the record have changed. I also listened toI've been listening to Erase Me for the past week, and after much thought, my initial opinions of the record have changed. I also listened to a podcast Spencer Chamberlain was on that really put into perspective what the writing process was all about. I have much more respect for the direction Underoath has gone into now. There's still a couple of tracks that need to grow on me, but overall Erase Me is a great album. It's jarring, going from Disambiguation or any of their older stuff to this, but I feel like it's one of those things you just have to get used to. People and opinions change over time, so it's understandable that after 8 years (10 if you count the current lineup), the band would have a major sound shift. Hopefully for the people like me who have bad first impressions, fall in love with this record over multiple listening sessions. Expand
  4. Jul 22, 2018
    8
    It's catchy, very versatile, and it has a good harmony but it fails on its structure.
  5. Apr 10, 2018
    8
    A band can't always be the same.
    Underoath is now different but this album gave me a great nostalgy. The essence is still there. The album is
    A band can't always be the same.
    Underoath is now different but this album gave me a great nostalgy. The essence is still there. The album is well balanced, Spencer stills very well. I'm really loving this album.
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  6. Apr 6, 2018
    4
    When Dallas Taylor left Underoath the band lost a lot of those fans who had loved the dirtier, and at times heavier, iteration of Underoath.When Dallas Taylor left Underoath the band lost a lot of those fans who had loved the dirtier, and at times heavier, iteration of Underoath. However, the debut of Spencer on They're Only Chasing Safety proved to be the catalyst for the future success of Underoath. The faith-based band was revered as pioneers in the age of post-hardcore and skinny-jean metalcore. What wasn't there to be a fan of? Though singing, courtesy Aaron Gillespie, became a more prominent piece of the group's music, the band never stepped away from its darker sound. Even now, with what long time fans may consider a huge departure, that darkness lingers.

    It is clear that the band has a message to deliver. What isn't as clear is whether or not this message is one which is proudly championed by all the men of Underoath or if Spencer, having worked on a side project not dissimilar from the sound of Erase Me, had some material and that gang was just looking for a reason to get back together. After listening to the entirety of the album, I'm inclined to believe it's the latter.

    Everything here isn't awful. As a matter of fact I can't say the album is objectively the mess that I feel it is in my own mind. I'm willing to plead my case regardless. See, when On My Teeth dropped I was supportive. It was clear they were changing a bit, but the components were still there to make the group identifiable as Underoath. When Rapture landed a few weeks ago, fear began to set in. What I heard sounded like a similar formula to that of other bands who have come and gone from Fearless Records. Not yet ready to give up hope, though not please at all with the use of electronic samples, I waited for the full album.

    It Has to Start Somewhere starts the album off on a note that indicates that we're in for a treat like only Underoath, the band which put Solid State Records on the map, can offer. For those that hadn't heart On My Teeth this may also be the first time hearing a curse word within the lyrics. There's an energy here that suggests slight deviations from their previous sound, but not enough to scare away fans. I then skipped Rapture and On My Teeth because I'd already heard them. Wake Me didn't do a lot to reenforce the sound they set up with It Has to Start Somewhere. In fact, Wake Me may be the catchiest song the band has every put to record and on a personal level I can't say it works for them.

    And then, sadly, much of the album unfolds with a handful of songs following similar structures. You have valley's of quiet subdued vocals met with short aggressive bouts of screaming or simply yelling. A few of the songs, which incorporate the occasional **** seem as if they do so to be gimmicky. Unfortunately it's already clear by this point that the band's edge is gone. They have become, what many may feel, the next Bring Me the Horizon. I wouldn't fault someone for confusing the two.

    The final song, aptly titled I Gave Up, seems to be a joke that is way too on the nose. Ultimately it's the perfect descriptor for the latest release from these once giants, as it seems they gave up trying to create their own sound and followed something that had already been laid out before them during the time they've been absent from the scene. It's too bad, but at least we have a catalog which spanned the better part of 20 years to fall back on.
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  7. Apr 9, 2018
    0
    It would be one thing if they had just changed their sound – historically, every Underoath album has had a unique style, so most fans are usedIt would be one thing if they had just changed their sound – historically, every Underoath album has had a unique style, so most fans are used to (and, I’d argue, excited for) the change this band brings every time they release a new record. Unfortunately, this album is a clear departure from anything resembling the creative, genre-defining band that existed before the breakup. Erase Me reeks of radio-friendly pop-rock in the vein of Bring Me The Horizon, which is genuinely heartbreaking for many of us who have been listening to Underoath since they were just a local band here in St. Pete.
    Generic self-pitying choruses are interwoven with buzzy chord progressions on what I assume are guitars, while Spencer largely foregoes his signature vocals for whines that, for some baffling reason, relegate Aaron to an occasional guest role. To me, that’s the strangest thing about this album – the original lineup is back together for the first time in 10 years, yet none of their strengths are utilized.
    All in all, this album is genuinely painful to listen to – like watching one of your idols star in an infomercial. If you love this band, you might be better off pretending they never got back together.
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