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Raise Vibration Image
Metascore
62

Generally favorable reviews - based on 6 Critics What's this?

User Score
6.6

Generally favorable reviews- based on 8 Ratings

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  • Summary: The 11th full-length studio release for the rock singer-songwriter Lenny Kravitz features the late Michael Jackson's vocals from sessions for (I Can’t Make It) Another Day.
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Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 2 out of 6
  2. Negative: 0 out of 6
  1. Sep 11, 2018
    80
    Kravitz knows how to sculpt not just sounds but a cohesive LP, and that kind of pro assurance when combined with his earnest hippie beliefs, make Raise Vibration a sunny, affirming listen.
  2. Sep 7, 2018
    72
    It’s this line between cheesy and unbelievably cool that Kravitz hops back and forth over throughout the album, never convincingly staying on one side. ... Worth the price of admission is “Low,” a funk-tinged easy-groover about keeping a relationship grounded. It’s sexy, it’s smooth, and it’s dance floor ready.
  3. Sep 7, 2018
    60
    What makes Raise Vibration more than just Professor Kravitz orating about the world’s ills is how he never forsakes catchy melodies for seriousness. His language is cutting (“It’s enough, and we all are just getting fucked” he sings on the latter track) but he presents it in a sweet, catchy way that’s easy to digest.
  4. Q Magazine
    Sep 7, 2018
    60
    It's heroically earnest and not a little preposterous, but the singer's charisma carries it over the line. [Oct 2018, p.112]
  5. Sep 11, 2018
    50
    Raise Vibration's more serious shortcoming is its lyrics, which stumble whenever they reach for grand proclamations on the state of the world.
  6. Mojo
    Sep 7, 2018
    40
    Kravitz's stylistic schizophrenia remains on Raise Vibration, whether in the early-80s electro-beats of Who Really Are The Monsters? or the What's Going On moves of It's enough. [Oct 2018, p.87]
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 2 out of 3
  2. Negative: 0 out of 3
  1. Sep 25, 2018
    9
    ____ "Raise Vibration" is an attractive mixture of funk, soul and rock, saturated with passion and words about love and acute social problems____ "Raise Vibration" is an attractive mixture of funk, soul and rock, saturated with passion and words about love and acute social problems of society. In each composition, a bright musical performance is played out from various instrumental parts: those are the piercing guitar solos, the psychedelic overflows of the synthesizers, the funky basses, the saxophone ... And of course - Lenny's impeccable voice, which sounds equally good both solo and in the environment gospel choir.
    :
    ____ In general, Lenny Kravitz undoubtedly fascinates in all its manifestations. The album is excellent!
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  2. Sep 10, 2018
    8
    Mixing different genres and sounds, Kravitz is more experimenting than ever and it pays off. From the retro, 70s sound of "Low" to the 80s,Mixing different genres and sounds, Kravitz is more experimenting than ever and it pays off. From the retro, 70s sound of "Low" to the 80s, electronic sound of "Who Really Are the Monsters?", "Raise Vibration" has got a lot of different details and sounds to pay attention to. It's definitely more than simple, straightforward rock-and-roll.
    But, what is the thing that makes this combination of songs a good, solid album? The simple message of love. A message Kravitz has been spreading for 30 years now.
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  3. Sep 7, 2018
    5
    A lot of the touchstones of Kravitz' previous outings are here, for better or worse: interesting arrangements, funk (more of a smooth-jazzA lot of the touchstones of Kravitz' previous outings are here, for better or worse: interesting arrangements, funk (more of a smooth-jazz funk this time for the most part), ballads, lots of God stuff. What's missing this time, strangely, is the stripped-down rock that made him a star - despite a near-miss or two, there's not a hard rocker in the bunch. Since his last album, "Strut", housed a couple of his best rockers since "Rock And Roll Is Dead" over 20 years ago, this is a major disappointment. To bring things down another notch, the song "Johnny Cash" (written to honor Cash and his wife, who comforted Kravitz when him mother died in 1995), despite its honorable intentions, is awkward and stilted. Kudos to Kravitz for being in experimental mode, but this one should fare much better on headphones than in concert. Kravitz has risen and fallen more than once, so I'm not counting him out yet, though if this were his first album I'd be on the fence about trying again. Expand