Rolling Stone's Scores

For 5,168 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 64% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Physical Graffiti [Remastered]
Lowest review score: 0 Know Your Enemy
Score distribution:
5168 music reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    On Anak Ko, she’s keeps doing it. The musical range is unsurprisingly wide, shifting from the swirling dreampop to dire guitar grind to smooth Seventies softness to Yo La Tengo-ish, country-tinged guitar pastorals to Nineties alt-rock. It’s all leveraged towards an unguarded sense of personal revelation.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Lover is, fittingly, evolutionary rather than revolutionary. But nevertheless it feels like an epiphany: free and unhurried, governed by no one concept or outlook, it represents Swift at her most liberated.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Building on their prior LP, Sheer Mag broaden their scope just a little more on A Distant Call while retaining the DIY grit and edgy concision that made them so arresting in the first place. This might technically be a concept album, but at 35 minutes, it’s still a punk rager at heart.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    So Much Fun doesn’t mark a step forward for his aesthetic, but rather an attempt to refine it.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    He is a genuinely engaging artist who raps with impressive intensity and clarity, if not nuance. He confronts his incurable sadness head-on, and it’s easy to identify with his mental health struggles. But for an album about depression, The Search contains a noticeable lack of tension and interior texture.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Just as Some Girls rejuvenated Mick and co., the Hold Steady’s latest finds the Brooklyn collective rediscovering the mix of morose jubilation and joyful myth-making they perfected a dozen years ago. Freed from the pressures of serving as Craig Finn’s primary creative outlet, the band has learned how to keep telling its hoodrat saga.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Of course, at the core of all Vernon’s albums are potent songs, branded with his magnificently swooning melodic sensibility and gorgeous singing. This set has a few of those songs.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sleater-Kinney deliver the goods almost immediately on their new LP, on a title track that begins with industrial clangs, then explodes into rock fury rivaling anything in their catalog.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Most of his 10th album, Port of Miami 2, is Ross exactly as you know and love him: the obscene boasts, the window-cracking bass, the speedboat cool, the various spins on raps-to-riches success.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The songs collected here are the tracks that didn’t make the albums and never hit the top 10 of the Billboard Hot 100 (22 of his other songs have). But as missives from an artist whose genius is surfing trends, staying in the conversation and testing to find out what works at any given moment, they collectively get at the soul of his artistic project.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    With all of the band’s nu-metal hallmarks at the forefront this time, We Are Not Your Kind sounds the more like the head-turning, self-titled debut they put out 20 years ago than any of their releases since. But what’s different here is a new sense of (gasp!) sophistication.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Cuco transmutes various pop methodologies to create his own blend of burnout soul.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    She turns eighteen this month, so raise your Big Gulp: as pop success stories go, this is a refreshing one.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    His superb major label debut Brandon Banks is sprawling autobiography overflowing with dense, unflinching, granular detail sourced from his 15-odd years of toting guns, staging robberies, and selling drugs in Southwest Houston.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The Big Day contains about as much tonal variation as a leather-bound wedding photo album. Chance is more interested in celebrating the miracle of love than examining love’s warts, or the labor required to build and sustain a lasting marriage.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    They’re still fun and vital, and they still know how to make an exit.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The gem here is the new song, “No Bullets Spent,” which is about praying for the end of some existential anguish (“What we need now’s an accident/No one to blame and no bullets spent”). It could be about politics, it could be about a bad day frontman Britt Daniel had waiting for his number to be called at the DMV. Regardless, it’s another catchy, taut, perfectly restrained rocker that belongs in a collection like this.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Ultimately, The Gift is a deft balancing act that weighs personal songwriting flourishes and meaning with Disneycore tropes, as well as a sincere desire to celebrate the music of the African diaspora with its fundamentally commercial obligations.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The Lost Tapes II, is a grab bag of loose tracks from this era, four very different album sessions, and naturally it’s a messy display of the many sides of Nas – storyteller, street life narrator, conscious MC, rap showboat, true-school historian, emo diarist – at both his most essential and least essential.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    As a stand-alone piece of music, its pacing tends to remain too static to uphold its heavy premise. The best songs arrive far too late, and early tracks like “How Many Times” and “Giant Baby” can be hard to distinguish from recent Coyne experiments like 2017’s Oczy Mlody.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    One of the greatest rhythm sections to ever rub-a-dub on planet Earth, Sly and Robbie’s client roster has included Dylan, Madonna, Serge Gainsbourg, and No Doubt. But the team’s best jams are the most deeply rooted in the Jamaican music they helped invent — at the core of Peter Tosh’s band; with the Compass Point All-Stars; and on their own Taxi Records sessions, source of some of the reggae canon’s mightiest sides. Their ur-grooves justify from the get-go Red Gold Green & Blue, a set of blues, r&b and soul covers of the sort that might otherwise land like pro-forma, unessential nostalgia.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Sheeran’s unobtrusively sweet voice easily slips between genres, but he struggles to connect with many of his A-list guest artists, deepening the album’s isolated mood.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Purple Mountains is the sound of that guy starting to come to terms with his reality, and maybe building a new emotional architecture in the wreckage. In any case, keep ’em coming. The journey is worth it.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    III
    Banks clearly encouraged them [her collaborators] to swing for the fences: The distressed sonics her get as extreme as Low got on last year’s Double Negative, albeit in much different context. It’s thrilling, gutting stuff.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If you liked Warm, you’ll like Warmer. It’s Tweedy at his most self-findingly laid back, low-key and ruminative, leavening intimate recreational folk-rock with offhanded guitar tastiness.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Case Study has gorgeous moments, but it lacks the overall clarity and focus of Freudian.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Ultimately, Oasis is a document of how far Balvin and Benito have come, and a blueprint of where they are headed.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An album that somehow exceeds the lofty expectations he and Madlib set with Piñata.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Help Us Stranger and Let’s Rock are simply great records from very different bands coming from the same ideals: Rock is a living thing, and guitars can be your best friends in the war on jive.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Help Us Stranger and Let’s Rock are simply great records from very different bands coming from the same ideals: Rock is a living thing, and guitars can be your best friends in the war on jive.