Rolling Stone's Scores

For 5,368 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 64% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Lemonade
Lowest review score: 0 Know Your Enemy
Score distribution:
5368 music reviews
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Hearing it reimagined 50 years later, the album’s themes — transcendence, renewal, breaking free of materialism — resonate even more than they did all those years ago.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    These overly literal ditties feel a little too simplistic. [Sep 2020, p.68]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The 80s-loving Vegas crew delivers its strongest set of songs in years. [Sep 2020, p.68]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Americana firebrand makes a grand rock & roll record worthy of her Bowie jumpsuits. [Sep 2020, 68]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    This batch of cadaverous Bowie-isms won't leave fang marks on your memory. [Sep 2020, p.68]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Doves amble as they surge, swirling in a middle distance between Radiohead and Coldplay. [Sep 2020, p.68]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Goats Head Soup didn’t — and still doesn’t — sound like what one would have expected from the Stones after Exile. ... The alternate mixes of a few of its songs don’t add terribly much, but the same can’t be said of an instrumental jam on “Dancing with Mr. D,.” which lets you eavesdrop as the band locks into a groove and jams without Jagger. ... The Brussels Affair bristles.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The ska-reggae legend sounds stronger than ever on Got to Be Tough, his first album in more than a decade.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Giving both of these records some distance allows for the songs to have breathing room, and for Whole New Mess to stand on its own.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    With Energy, Disclosure continue the refined, radio-friendly takes on house, U.K. garage, and more that made them stars, but find plenty of room to expand into new territory.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    At its best, King’s Disease is a slick Illmatic redux, a fresh portrait of Nas’ now-mythical hustler years that expands his Queensbridge universe with new characters and anecdotes and finds him in vintage form as a rapper and storyteller. At its worst, it is a misguided attempt to paper over abuse allegations and a stark showcase of his increasingly questionable politics when it comes to women. 26 years after Illmatic, Nas still has room to grow.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    She stops trying to keep up with the Halseys and happily defaults to the fizzy bombast that is her stadium-size safety zone. [Aug 2020, p.72]
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    At its heart, Down in the Weeds is a wounded, hopeful take on the Los Angeles midlife-crisis record (he moved there a few years ago). It’s a topic well-suited for Oberst’s abstract cynicism, as he tackles crumbling SoCal interstates, Malibu beach disasters, and, of course, yoga.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The record flows, hitting knee-skinning highs like “Stuck in Your Head” (“I just wanted to pick up the tempo!” Bognanno sing-songs as the band counts off), barn-burners like “You” (about, it seems, an absent parent) and the hauntingly discordant “Hours and Hours.” Whatever the subject matter, whatever the tempo, each track finds Bognanno full-throated, wild and free.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Full of shiny seventies pop rock simulations, but you would be much better off putting on an old Todd Rundgren or Raspberries record. [Aug 2020, p.73]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's kind of like a psychedelic Randy Newman. [Aug 2020, p.73]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Modern electric blues as Prince and George Clinton would have it. [Aug 2020, p.73]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Examines small-town origins, fatherhood, and matter of the heart with extra earnestness but few surprises. [Aug 2020, p.73]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    All of the pieces in the box set complete a puzzle that explains how McCartney found himself again and hit the stride that has propelled him to the present day.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Although they indulge more textures this time, they don’t stray so far from Dogrel’s art-punk blueprint to the point of losing themselves. It’s just that the palette is wider and more pronounced. If anything, their chiming, noisy guitars and messy arrangements only fit their highfalutin aspirations even better.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    For all of its melancholy, Such Pretty Forks feels personal but never profound. [May 2020, p.89]
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    But the real surprise is the music itself — the most head-spinning, heart-breaking, emotionally ambitious songs of her life.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Rossdale’s voice becomes a distraction when it overpowers the group’s wooshy guitar textures. But mostly Bush’s biggest sin is going back to the same well again and again hoping to find something new, something vital but coming up emptyhanded.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The 12 tracks on Gaslighter fall into easy, radio-friendly categories: empowerment anthem, cheeky ukulele kiss-off, minimalist protest song. Coupled with a long-overdue drop of the “Dixie” from their name, the arrangement dissolves most of the group’s lingering connections to their street-corner bluegrass origins.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The album shines brightest when Juice stops navel-gazing, when he tempers his fatalism with a sense of hope and togetherness, the yang to his depressive yin.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Their fifth album is pure misanthropic splendor. [Jul 2020, p.87]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The New Wave greats haven't sounded this raw and real since the early Eighties. [Jul 2020, p.87]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The highlights are when Nelson sings the songs of his old friends.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    As with Wainwright’s best works, it’s musical theater without the theater (remember, he once interpolated the theme from Phantom of the Opera on Release the Stars’ “Between My Legs”) and it comes with all of the good and bad that comes with stage drama.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Pop-punk trio deliver glittery hooks and raw feminine energy. [Jul 2020, p.87]
    • Rolling Stone