Rolling Stone's Scores

For 5,717 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 64% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Magic
Lowest review score: 0 Know Your Enemy
Score distribution:
5717 music reviews
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With age/sex/location, Lennox has delivered her best work to date, one that mostly leaps past her patchy but inspired Shea Butter Baby debut in quality.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    $oul $old $eparately is solid work made by an established character.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The minimalist, glassy music, combined with her depiction of her younger companion’s spirited imagination, makes for an ending that manages to contain enough optimism to inspire O, Zinner, and Chase to keep their collective spirit smoldering, even against the 21st century’s brutal headwinds.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In short, it’s Björk at her absolute Björkiest.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Rod Wave’s brush with legal danger gives Beautiful Mind’s its structure as well as a sense that he’s charting new territory, and not just the themes of success and alienation that fueled past hits like Ghetto Gospel and Pray 4 Love. Some listeners might be wary of this chastened figure who nevertheless doggedly sticks to the “trenches” and complains on “Better,” “I thought it’d be smiles on they faces, tears coming out they eyes, hearing congratulations/But they make it no better.”
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Hardest Part is the result of her stepping away and figuring out who she is — and the songs she wrote during that time sound appealing even as they’re digging into knotty, complex emotions.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    They’re a truly great pop group—and Born Pink is the great pop album they were born to make.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Otherworldly music-box twinkles on the mournful “Only Child,” a gentle midtempo strut rising as the Monica Martin duet “Go in Light” nears self-acceptance — illuminate the close-to-the-bone lyrics while also placing Mumford’s voice in musical contexts that differ from his namesake band’s output. Those subtle differences are just enough to underscore the personal voyage (self-titled) takes.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It seems the isolation of lockdown made her bolder about looking inside herself. The most exciting thing about Hold the Girl is that you can’t even guess where Sawayama might go next.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Words & Music improves the sound on Reed’s original tape (available to hear, with many others, at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts at Lincoln Center, home to the Reed Archives), and evidently takes some liberty with song order.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Their third and most arresting record since their reformation.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Yungblud is a whirlwind listen, fusing together building blocks of various rock subgenres—mostly Britpop’s hip-shaking carnality and emo’s on-the-brink wails—then spit-shining them a bit before adding confessional lyrics.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Listening to Khaled’s albums is like searching for blessings amidst the chaff, and the signal-to-noise ratio is generally low. But God Did isn’t as torturously bad as, say, 2019’s Father of Asahd.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Swift came out of the gate sounding bright-eyed but remarkably seasoned. [December 5, 2012]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album is like a wild ride in a muscle car where someone’s constantly fiddling with the radio, forever chasing the high that comes with hearing the perfect riff at the perfect moment. ... Viva Las Vengeance sounds great, its piston-like licks and soaring solos acting like time machines to a rose-colored-glasses-refracted era.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Cheat Codes is a balm to Gen X hip-hop fans who feel out of step with trap’s spare beats and mumble rap’s hazy flow, proof positive that hip-hop requires a senior circuit.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A thrill ride of a listen, a motley mix of slick bops and searing confessionals that wonderfully encapsulate all of her various vibes.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    At 30 tracks and classified as his fourth album, The Last Slimeto feels like an overstuffed, overlong and sometimes-compelling compact disc from the No Limit years.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There are few outright misfortunes on Playboy. One miss is “Havin’ Fun,” which taps into a reggae-pop groove that feels sugary and dated. Then, repetitive placement of hit single “Peru” and its remix. ... Despite these choices, Fireboy’s third album maintains a strong mix of charming songs and engaging storytelling.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s a fine wind-down album, one that can be put on shuffle at the end of a long-summer-night bacchanal, when revelers reach that point where they’re too tired to do anything but bask in the glow of the blowout they just threw.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A high-octane dose of emotion cushioned by pleasant, if sometimes a bit anonymous, pop.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Throughout, King Princess’ potent melodies are bolstered by subtle production touches that heighten the anxieties and intricacies of her candid lyrics.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Is this an evolution from Lemonade? Not quite. But with Renaissance, Beyoncé is more relatable than ever, giving listeners all the anthems and sultry slow burners we love and have come to expect from her, proving that inclusivity is the new black.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Expand[s] her folk-based sound, mixing Radiohead-style atmospherics, Seventies pop melodies and even a splash of soul. [Jul - Aug 2022, p.120]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    At times, 2000 strains under its ambition. It’s unclear whether Bada$$ wants to build an Important Album or simply release something commensurate with his growing celebrity.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It seems to reflect what the 28-year-old singer-songwriter is most interested in at this very moment, which appears to be a blend of Nineties alt-rock and turn-of-the-century shopping-mall pop. [Jul - Aug 2022, p.117]
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s the equivalent of a headbanger, and while one could argue her talent deserves a richer canvas, it satisfies all the same.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    If only the lyrics were as articulate as the melodies and playing. [Jul - Aug 22, p.120]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s empowering to see Trifilio own the full spectrum of her emotions, and it’s what cements Beach Bunny’s latest record as a masterclass in confessional rock and roll.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    18
    On the occasions when his slinky guitar takes center stage — like on melancholy instrumental renditions of the Pet Sounds tracks “Don’t Talk (Put Your Head on My Shoulder)” and “Caroline, No,” or the first half of Marvin Gaye’s “What’s Going On” — the results are predictably serviceable. But Depp’s pro forma, double-tracked vocals provide scant additional justification for the project’s existence; and in a few unfortunate cases (like when he attempts a soul croon on Smokey Robinson’s “Ooo Baby Baby”) you won’t be able to find the skip button fast enough.