Slant Magazine's Scores

For 2,642 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 36% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 61% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 RTJ2
Lowest review score: 0 Fireflies
Score distribution:
2642 music reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    With so many flat, unoriginal riffs and unmemorable choruses, there’s just not enough meat here to reward that approach, and despite its unrelenting volume, An Obelisk just feels empty without the wide-ranging dynamics and ambitious arrangements that have, until now, defined Titus Andronicus’s music.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Erotic Reruns is a collection of ultimately benign love songs, as the eroticism proposed by the album’s title is glaringly absent across 29 scant minutes.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Help Us Stranger is another compelling exhibit in the band’s continuing quest to prove that there’s still more to be mined from the supposedly anachronistic guitar-rock template. Almost every track here is another example of one that would never have reached the same heights without the contributions of each band member.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Widow’s Weeds may lack the arena-sized atmospherics and anthemic party songs of past Silversun Pickups efforts, but with each additional listen the hooks sink in deeper and the melodies stay longer in your head. It’s catchy, heartfelt, and far less forgettable than…what were those previous two albums named again?
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Madonna has a reputation for being a trendsetter, but her true talent lies in bending those trends to her will, twisting them around until they’re barely recognizable, and creating something entirely new.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The EP’s dubious employment of hip-hop tropes and graphic sexual metaphors reaches its nadir on ballroom-inspired “Cattitude,” part boast track and part ode to Miley’s female prowess.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Although the album explores intergenerational black trauma and joy, Woods’s personal insight into such experience functions as the album’s anchor and serves as a more accessible entry point.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Dedicated, is a carefully calibrated attempt at brand extension, reprising the effervescent pop of her last two albums while at the same time acknowledging that the 33-year-old is now a full-grown woman. For the most part, Jepsen succeeds at threading that needle.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    One does eventually feel the album’s length, with the stretch of songs in between “You Left Your Soul with You” and “I Am Easy to Find” feeling comparatively pedestrian—the sounds of a band treading more familiar ground before really staring to take chances. But once they do, the sprawl quickly begins to justify itself, revealing some of the most ambitious music the National has ever made.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    At 18 tracks and 58 minutes, Father of the Bride is by far the longest release by a band whose brevity was once one of their best characteristics. This results in a not-insignificant amount of bloat, including at least one or two songs—like the lounge jazz disaster “My Mistake”--that should have been left in the outtakes pile.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Like 2017’s This Old Dog and 2015’s Another One, the album doesn’t represent a progression so much as a broadening of what DeMarco has already proven himself to be capable of as a songwriter.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Certainly, the shift from the humanity and warmth of blues-rock to the synthetic robotics of electronic music is intentional, but the album ends too abruptly for one to clearly discern the full extent of its significance.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Pink’s eighth album, Hurts 2B Human, finds the singer peddling the same boilerplate pop-rock songs about self-empowerment and existential angst that have defined her career for almost 20 years.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    With its dreamy atmosphere and loitering tempos, the album is more reliant than ever on Finn’s wordplay. ... At the same time, Finn can get too bogged down in minutiae, such as devoting an entire verse of “Holyoke” to binge-watching TV shows. But even then, the aside serves the song’s larger purpose of illustrating the anxiety-ridden narrator’s vain attempts to distract himself from the omnipresence of death.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, the album only contains about an EP’s worth of solid material, with the rest of the running time devoted to a tedious children’s fairytale. ... [But the full] songs sound like the basis of a proper follow-up to Yoshimi even more than the zany At War with the Mystics, did.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Expertly sequenced in a concise, 33-minute package, Cuz I Love You moves from strength to strength. Even its more minor tracks feature standout moments.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ventura serves as a reminder of the magic that can result from looking to the past to inform the future.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Save for the wonky sequencing choice of front-loading the two most negligible songs ... No Geography could easily pass for a collection of epic B sides to some of Tom Rowlands and Ed Simons’s signature classics.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    For a burgeoning artist still establishing his signature style, Khalid settles into a surprising complacency here, failing to experiment with the template of his debut.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    This album lacks the stitched-together quality of FLOTUS, that certain emphasis on atmosphere, texture, and the unexpected, rather than structure and melody, that makes that album alternately impenetrable and transcendent.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Fortunately, though an old-school country aesthetic defines the album—the banjo picking on “Nine Pins,” the sweet hillbilly harmonies on “Outflow”--Curt’s irrepressible songwriting quirks make the rest of Dusty Notes anything but formulaic. The post-Bostrom Meat Puppets have often veered much closer to modern alt-country than the hardcore of their early days, and Dusty Notes is no exception; in fact, it might be the mellowest of their albums to date.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Canterbury Girls still succeeds at being Lily & Madeleine’s most personal and cohesive work to date, but the siblings too often seem as if they’re reluctant to let loose and lean into the music.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    By showcasing an artistic fusion of the tranquil with the bustling, the primal with the technologically advanced, the compilation shows how much work has already been done to find ways of summarizing and celebrating the potential of this new reality.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Yola seems capable of not only expertly mimicking the sounds of the past, but also creating something that will itself stand the test of time.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s worth applauding Khan, who turns 66 next month, for continuing to make an album as vital and contemporary-sounding as Hello Happiness.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While not without its flaws, Signs heals in this way. It’s often so joyous and spirited that, for a moment, it’s easy to envision better times ahead.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Thank U, Next is easily Grande’s most sonically consistent effort to date, even if that means some of the album’s sleek R&B tracks tend to blur together.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Buoys may not mark a major departure in Panda Bear’s sound, but it bristles with the creative energy of an artist confronting his deepest, most destructive demons.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The band flips the traditional lexical of their genre, emphasizing the spaces between the anthemic, quasi-pavlovian verse-chorus-verse structure that defines classic rock n’ roll. The band’s sixth album, Future Ruins, similarly thrives in the spaces between the power chords and choruses.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Be assured that Sunshine Rock maintains a mostly sharp-edged sound, at least approaching the same prodigious level of guitar fuzz that made Patch the Sky such a bracing kick in the jaw.