Slant Magazine's Scores

For 2,890 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 36% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 61% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Dear Science,
Lowest review score: 0 Fireflies
Score distribution:
2890 music reviews
    • 93 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Due in part to its tonal variety and expert sequencing, Renaissance never feels monotonous, despite its near-relentless forward motion.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    An album that might have had greater impact if it didn’t feel so literally and figuratively pre-programmed.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It’s at this blurry intersection of inscrutability and openness, of pure persona and slavish authenticity, that White has often done his best work. Much of Entering Heaven Alive exists too far to one side of that spectrum.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Ultimately, World Wide Pop succumbs to sameiness, with several songs in a row set to a similarly frantic tempo and overly compressed, treble-heavy sound mix. Rather than allowing individual sounds to stand out, the chaotic placement of samples makes them all run together.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A half-baked pastiche of previous releases. Even the album’s highlights can’t compete with the best cuts on later albums like 2014’s El Pintor. In an attempt to move forward, the band has simply disassembled and repackaged the stylistic traits that made them special in the first place.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Hellfire is designed to be heard as an album, rather than chopped into playlists—but it’s 180 degrees away from the dourness of the usual prog-adjacent music. The album rewards digging beneath its surface and influences, as it engages with rock’s history while simultaneously taking it in imaginative new directions.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Un Verano Sin Ti is more often than not fueled by the artist’s silky, pleading singing than his kinetic rapping. And rather than play culture vulture and disingenuously embody an ascendant style, Bunny doubles down on his heritage and cultural identity.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The intricately constructed It’s Almost Dry is still part of a now decades-long roll-out attesting to his bravado—and we’re not complaining.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While some of its sonic experiments aren’t entirely successful, Home, Before and After is spiked with humor and pathos, and Spektor holds the two in balance as skillfully as she ever has.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Its weaker moments suggest a group that’s struggling to find something new to say, both thematically and musically. But when the band stretches out and explores their full dynamic range, capturing the dystopian overtones wafting through Wilson’s lyrics, they’re still capable of reaching cathartic heights.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Though Sometimes, Forever is more sonically diverse and lyrically cohesive than Soccer Mommy’s previous albums, its lyrical themes and melodies aren’t nearly as indelible.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The album serves as a beautiful dissection of dance as action and concept. Beyond that, it’s the most experimental Perfume Genius effort to date, and a bold addition to an already impeccable discography.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    In casting off the lo-fi chaos of Live Forever and, thankfully, most of its flirtations with hip-hop, Bartees strikes a somewhat anonymous note with this album’s well-executed but rather straightforward rock, replete with several showy guitar solos.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The lack of momentum caused by the absence of a consistent beat serves, almost paradoxically, to envelop us in Eyeye’s often mesmerizing cinematic textures. ... But while most of Eyeye’s trappings as a chronicle of a breakup are successful, sometimes Li’s writing can too blatantly underline her concepts.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    In much the same way that he juxtaposes Afropop and R&B, Obongjayar alternates between modes of vulnerability and swagger throughout Some Nights I Dream of Doors.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Mr. Morale & the Big Steppers can be emotionally ugly and unpleasant, but it never feels less than completely authentic to Lamar’s personal journey. It’s thankfully levied with glimpses of joy and melodic hooks.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The album both sees Styles cementing his status as music’s premier sensitive, shy guy and growing comfortable enough within the pop idiom that he inhabits to push against it—but only ever so slightly. Styles may be a fashion trendsetter, but with Harry’s House, he continues trying on different styles in an effort to discover his own.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    WE
    The melodies and arrangements here are as excellent as they are predictable, and the band recaptures their classic sound on “The Lightning I, II,” with a comfortingly familiar blend of wide-open-skies Springsteen/U2 bombast and pour-out-your-heart emotionalism. But at times, especially toward the beginning of the album, WE takes a more tentative approach.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Wet Tennis stages a 35-minute dance party that’s tempered, as well as bolstered, by notes of reflective melancholy.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A Bit of Previous manages to strike a balance between celebrating the group’s familiar sound and proving that they still have something to say.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    At times, the album’s songs are so breezy that they’re barely indistinguishable from one another. There are moments here, as is Toro y Moi’s wont, where the pursuit of mood takes precedent above all else.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Though she once again flashes her talent for delivering emotionally wrought tales of heartbreak, Serpentina asserts its uniqueness in paradoxically conventional and unsurprising ways.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    An entire album of similar songs might have felt like a retread. But on Fear of the Dawn, they’re rewards for experiencing something very rare: a long-established artist intent on pushing boundaries further than he ever has before.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    He doesn’t bring his roguish charm to his latest. Though this album will satisfy those nostalgic for the mellower side of ‘70s and ‘90s rock, it doesn’t chart new terrain for Vile.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The album doesn’t possess the observational heft of 2017’s Pure Comedy, a post-apocalyptic survey of America’s anxieties and lamentable cultural habits. Rather, the narratives and wordplay found on Chloë and the Next 20th Century, while at times evocative given Tillman’s way with language, are comparatively toothless and too clever by half.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Koffee is charming and winningly wholesome in the first mode [expressing her gratitude to be alive], but her attempts to meld tributes to family and life’s simplicities with designer name drops and empty boasts can feel awkward and misplaced. ... An album that doesn’t always play to its young creator’s strengths.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In taking bits and fragments from both her previous work and that of her contemporaries, Rosalía has fashioned an album rife with the contradictory sounds, lyrical themes, and artistic impulses of the past and present.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As danceable and often hooky as these songs are, there’s still a sense of reclusiveness, an inscrutability, that permeates the album.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Harding continues to exercise her versatility and restraint, delivering an album that invites close attention and rewards it with understated surprises.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Though Charli’s latest jettisons some of the sonic adventurousness of her past releases, it still finds the singer workshopping the reckless abandon of her persona.