Metascore
48

Mixed or average reviews - based on 22 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 5 out of 22
  2. Negative: 4 out of 22
  1. Both infectiously danceable and highly intelligent.
  2. Unlike other would-be indie-dance pretenders, this is properly danceable stuff; fat basses and catchy percussion beats are punctured by intoxicating keyboard motifs.
  3. Their zeal is such that, for the most part, we can overlook their failure to be flawless.
  4. The album's sinewy rhythms and monochrome production sheen start to fade into the background after a while, but as far as capturing a certain political and musical zeitgeist, "Stealing Of A Nation" does so accurately, and with more honesty and integrity than most.
  5. New Musical Express (NME)
    70
    They sound like they actually mean it. [11 Sep 2004, p.57]
  6. If you'd never heard Gotham!, you might very well find much to like about Stealing of a Nation.
  7. Urb
    60
    Too often we get ill-fated experiments in electronic circa 1997 and overly polished replications of their biggest hit to date, "Electrify." [Sep 2004, p.116]
  8. Spin
    58
    They've de-funned rebellion and turned it into a task. [Oct 2004, p.109]
  9. Overly polished and far too artificial.
  10. The material lacks the gauzy groove of Gotham!, replaced by techno-savvy beats and a synthetic sheen so soulless it C3PO’s all of the group’s human swagger.
  11. Under The Radar
    50
    By the time the fifth track plays, I feel like I just listened to the same song five times in a row. [#7]
  12. Blender
    40
    Roman's politically spiked lyrics sound shrugged-off and flimsy. [Sep 2004, p.141]
  13. Alternative Press
    40
    Often feels like the soundtrack for a party that's running short on ideas. [Oct 2004, p.132]
  14. Rolling Stone
    40
    Radio 4 show a real lack of gusto. [28 Oct 2004, p.98]
  15. Stealing of a Nation has some nice melodies, driving rhythms, hooky choruses, and fuzzy explosive guitar, but the sameness of the beats, the laziness of the lyrics, and Max Heyes' (Doves, Primal Scream) clipped, staccato production are enough to do the album in.
  16. Stealing of a Nation is a slick, calculated record that misses its target on all accounts.
  17. Mojo
    40
    Heyes has polished the band into tedium, with live guitars and drums drowned out by high sheen studio gloss and painfully dated loops. [Sep 2004, p.104]
  18. Q Magazine
    40
    They've lost the spark. [Sep 2004, p.122]
  19. Shiny, soulless dance tracks that would have been mediocre even as Rick Astley backing tracks.
  20. However tiresome the slogans, worse is the fact that the beats are lazy.
  21. Radio 4 can be commended for at least trying to move past the purposeful lo-fi of Gotham! and into fresher territory, but there's no bell or whistle in the world that could energize the utterly impotent songs at the core of Stealing of a Nation.
  22. Shows how slavish reproduction curdles into artistic bankruptcy.
User Score
6.2

Generally favorable reviews- based on 5 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 3 out of 5
  2. Negative: 1 out of 5
  1. FlinchBot
    Apr 26, 2006
    0
    The worst record I have hear din years. I wanted to turn it off after the second song, but kept it in hoping to find any redeeming value in The worst record I have hear din years. I wanted to turn it off after the second song, but kept it in hoping to find any redeeming value in this. I want an hour of my life back, please. Full Review »
  2. HenryB
    Feb 16, 2005
    6
    Ironic now that post-9/11 political protest is in full swing Radio 4 make their most passive and soul-less record to date. You only hope that Ironic now that post-9/11 political protest is in full swing Radio 4 make their most passive and soul-less record to date. You only hope that live they can salvage some of the magic displayed on 2001's 'Gotham!' Full Review »