NOW Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 2,812 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 The Life Of Pablo
Lowest review score: 20 Testify
Score distribution:
2812 music reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    13 exuberant folk-pop songs delivered with clarity, colour and conviction.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The hour-long LP often plays out like an experimental 80s fever dream, but it’s still anchored by The Weeknd’s broody sonic DNA.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Across Suddenly, Snaith surrenders to the current. If you do, too, you’ll find a rich and rewarding listening experience.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The album is both challenging and rewarding. On songs like Fresh Laundry, Allie X’s vocals are often treated with high-gloss effects that steal the personality from her voice. It’s not until final track Learning In Public that you hear her unvarnished, which by then sounds jarring. It often feels like she’s doing too much with too much.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Boucher's production prowess, beautifully complex and ambitious songwriting, is self-evident on Miss Anthropocene.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Things pick up toward the end with the slightly more upbeat run of Lost In Yesterday, Is It True and It Might Be Time. For the most part, though, Parker is a better producer than he is a songwriter.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Have We Met is another new departure, yet it still has that familiar strange storytelling swagger that’s at the heart of Destroyer.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If Cry Cry Cry had the feel of a band shaking off the cobwebs and getting used to each other’s company once again, Thin Mind leaves no doubt about Wolf Parade’s continued vitality. You instantly feel that renewed vigour in the storming first seconds of the opening Under Glass.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Andy Shauf’s new songs are fictional but feel oh so real, especially if you live in Toronto and even more especially if you live in Parkdale and frequent Skyline, the diner where most of the Toronto-based musician’s new album takes place. ... There are new melodic and rhythmic risks taken.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Lyrically, Styles is at his best when he’s biting. 0000... He’s not exactly mining unexplored territory. But, he’s an Internet Boyfriend – and Internet Boyfriends are non-threatening. As he inches closer towards the adult pop contemporary charts, Styles is thankfully owning his one-fifth of the One Direction power-pop legacy.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    There are a handful of feel-good moments. ... But it’s not enough to carry the bloated 18-song track list to a satisfying end. Instead it feels like getting caught in an endless kaleidoscope of solipsistic nostalgia. The effect is suffocating in its repetitiveness.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Cohen’s voice is at the centre of all the songs – present and passionate, the unmistakable deep rasp even better matching his searching weariness the older he got. And it’s all here, that never-duplicated mix of sex and death, the sacred and the profane.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Jesus Is King provides an undeniably moving and distinct new chapter in the book of Kanye. Whether you choose to skip it or place it high on your mantel, its cultural significance is only bound to grow.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Her sad-girl persona, thrust upon her unwittingly by music media, transforms into its most dramatic form. It’s a brazen sadness echoed through crashing symbols and spacious synths. The songs are devastating, but also nourishing: it’s a whole new version of Olsen.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Recorded in her cabin in the woods of New Hampshire, the album has a strong connection to nature and draws on themes of survival, healing and spirituality. ... Not all tracks sound like club hits, however. Deep Connections has a soft, ethereal quality created by synthy arpeggios and My Body Is Powerful samples soothing nature sounds – birdcall and distant howls – over a pentatonic scale.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s more polished than most S-K albums, but it’s still a flurry of frenetic chords, caustic drum beats and yelps and hisses from Carrie Brownstein and Tucker. Clark gave The Center Won’t Hold a very modern filter and sheen, but Sleater-Kinney still set the tone.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Piano, reverb and guitar fuzz make it Del Rey’s dreamiest and most cohesive album since 2015’s Honeymoon and her most rock-inspired since 2014’s Ultraviolence. The National Anthem singer adds new shade to her ongoing California period, re-evaluating the narrative of life in the United States that she’s built her brand on.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    He’s managed to inject this compact collection of eight tunes with more than a whiff of 90s alt-radio nostalgia, but the songs are hummable enough to rebuff anyone inclined toward cynical eye-rolling.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Beyond the amber waves of grain, Purple Mountains offer fans a feast of food for thought.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    With 22 tracks over 80 minutes (including a few skits you’ll skip after the first listen), it’s way too long. It’s themed around Chance’s wedding to his longtime partner, Kristen Corley – a rite of passage that mirrors the “big day” of his debut album release. And like a wedding in which the priest’s sermon is getting in the way of the dinner buffet, you can really feel it drag.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album evokes images of oceans, lakes and rivers in not only the album art, song titles and lyrics, but also in the overall atmosphere. Songs fluctuate like water, varying from tumultuous and joyous to still and tranquil. They flow with ease.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The album wouldn't be satisfying if it was just another version of Freudian. But Caesar calls the album an experiment, and that's often what it feels like. He's still figuring it all out.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Individually, the songs are absorbing, but when listened back to back, they begin to lose their magic.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s rock ’n’ roll for 2019, though the band calls it simply pub rock. Either way, it’ll get a mosh going.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    He remains a confident and commanding rapper, full of agile double-time flows and verses that skip from biographical vignettes and life lessons to boasting. But, given he rarely has more than one verse per song, Diaspora gives us a fragmented window into his thoughts.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Musically, it's considerably less abstract than his last solo album, 2014's Tomorrow's Modern Boxes. Like the other albums under his name (including last year's Suspiria soundtrack and his pseudo-solo side project Atoms for Peace) it's more electronic than rock, but there's a warmth to it you wouldn't expect.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An all-you-can-eat steak buffet for listeners. ... The musical arrangements are even sparser than Callahan’s last studio album, 2013’s Dream River, yet his foghorn voice remains intimately pushed to the forefront of the mix.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Like fine wine, Bill Hader or Gillian Anderson, Greys are only getting better with age.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Their lush and vivid sounds feel like a reaction to change--and the self-reckoning required to move forward.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Full of 80s college rock and 90s indie rock feel-goodness, the band’s debut album Football Money will no doubt fool throwback slackers into adopting this band as their own.