Consequence's Scores

For 3,880 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Rumours [35th Anniversary Deluxe Edition]
Lowest review score: 0 Jesus Is King
Score distribution:
3880 music reviews
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Seek Shelter is a rich representation of Iceage’s bravery as a band.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Dropkick Murphys continue to do what they do best on Turn Up That Dial, churning out an album full of upbeat Celtic riffs and sing-along choruses.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Gojira have delivered a brisk, eminently listenable record that expands on their melodic sensibilities without abandoning their experimental tendencies, environmentalist policies, and emotional potency.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Every aspect is written and performed impeccably, with track sequencing that highlights both the variety of the material and the wisdom of its concepts. True to its intentions, then, The Million Masks of God is a gorgeously tuneful and thought-provoking gem.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    When you turn on a Dinosaur Jr. record, the thinking goes, it should always sound like a Dinosaur Jr. record. I’m happy to report that Sweep It into Space does, in fact, check this box.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Fearless (Taylor’s Version) states boldly, simply and perhaps, generously, that this is a story still worth telling – and a fight worth fighting.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    On their second studio effort, they step out of the shadow of their influences, carving a sound of their own. Where they go from here is anyone’s guess.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Violence Unimagined doesn’t precisely deliver a standout track, but it promises an exciting and surprisingly subtle turn in the band’s legacy of brutality.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    If The Offspring want to stay in their comfort zone, there are plenty of fans who won’t object, but it won’t keep them relevant. On the plus side, Let the Bad Times Roll offers hints of creative tangents that could revitalize the band next time around – if they’re willing to challenge themselves.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Throughout ROADRUNNER…, their psychedelic-saturated groupthink frequently coheres into daring and undeniably moving work, smoothing over the rough spots and small stumbles.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    For the first time in a long time, the future feels uncertain and unformed. This is the music that will help us charge forward into the unknown.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    This album release coincides with the aforementioned documentary, and as the details of Lovato’s rocky recovery continue to unfurl, there’s a bit of concern in the idea that this record is a bit too intrinsically tied to another very public narrative. She tells us, over and over within the album, that this devastating chapter of her life is over and gone. In the aching, tender closer, she sings that she’s in a “good place” in a track of the same name. I desperately want to believe her.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Another strong record worthy of their consistent discography. Longtime fans will find plenty to enjoy on Tonic Immobility. The supergroup’s musical personality remains intact.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The Bitter Truth is reminiscent of the band’s older material but also entirely fresh. It does not feel like a band going through the motions.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    All in all, he has a pretty solid record of radio-ready hits, some that could double back as hazy, danceable club tracks. But MLK could have been left to rest in peace.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Chemtrails over the Country Club is a gorgeous listen: charming, clever, and vulnerable. Del Rey is as effective as ever in painting American fantasies, evoking nostalgia for realities always out of reach.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    A History of Nomadic Behavior showcases a band that’s able to make its music more challenging while also being mindful of songcraft and being subtle about it in both respects.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    As with most of the LP, the instrumentation and lyrics are equal parts memorable and evil. Let’s face it, memorable and evil are two traits any fan would want from a Rob Zombie album.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    On Show Me How You Disappear, IAN SWEET reveals herself as an innovative artist unafraid to shine the light on deep, difficult complication and to create bright, interesting pop music that answers only to itself.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    What Cave and Ellis have crafted with Carnage is a refreshing respite from chaos, a record that sits at the burning edge of dawn and anticipates destruction’s undoing.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The Melvins’ winning combination of riffs and black humor is in full force on Working with God, making the album recommended listening for longtime fans and newcomers alike.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The newly turned-up volume and heavier instrumentals of synths, bass, and drum programming still never drown out Baker’s tender vocals, which are consistently unexpected and innovative.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    By introducing what could arguably be described as some of their most introspective lyrics to date into their rock and roll alchemy, Cloud Nothings delivered an album that totes an intriguing combination of coolness and comfort.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    As a debut release, Cool Dry Place is remarkable. Katy Kirby has crafted a series of captivating indie rock-pop tracks, all centered around a voice with clarity reminiscent of Sylvan Esso or Haley Heynderickx, but swift and whimsical movements that feel all Kirby’s own.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    There’s a level of introspection present on the record that’s hard to duplicate, and when coupled with a stunning exploration of queer relationships, it creates something truly extraordinary. And frankly, triteness is solvable, and there’s beauty in the simplicity.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    On TYRON, slowthai doesn’t make grand statements or platitudes like a politician. He simply offers his own story of perseverance, hand extended and Mona Lisa smile brimming.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    This album is the payoff of a risk: while this may not have been a vocally challenging album for Williams, it can be deeply difficult to share the quiet corners of the soul, the stories we might not want to tell but need to for the sake of healing.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    An essential listen for fans and a fair introduction for newcomers, Medicine at Midnight feels like the rare late-career release that genuinely earns its spots within the legacy setlist.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    This Lost Themes run is the best legacy sequel in this exhaustive era of legacy sequels, and if we’re lucky, the credits will never roll.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    OK Human lands as a surprisingly charming collection of pop tunes whose imperfections add to rather than detract from the experience.