Glide Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 888 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 67% higher than the average critic
  • 7% same as the average critic
  • 26% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 79
Highest review score: 100 We Will Always Love You
Lowest review score: 40 Weezer (Teal Album)
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 0 out of 888
888 music reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Despite its historical importance in completing something of a missing link in the wide arc of Nobel Laureate’s career, The Complete Budokan 1978 is notably missing designation as an entry into the ongoing archive initiative known as The Bootleg Series. Consequently, this is one of those ever-so-rare Bob Dylan items to be taken almost strictly at face value and savored as such.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Yes, it’s as good as you’d imagine.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    18 tracks of songwriting prowess set to dusty orchestrations that shake you to your core. For his first solo release in three years, Aesop Rock has never sounded hungrier as everything that makes him such a powerhouse rapper gets elevated and reimagined on what might be his best work in years.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Hadsel is a stunning set of songs that demand and deserve your undivided attention, put your phone to the side, finish your household chores, and allow Beirut’s latest to transport you to a meditative state.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The trend was fairly clear in coming, with each passing record Medford has shifted towards more mainstream sounds. Fully embracing the break-up/hook-up dance-ready pattern (with slight distortion around the edges) Medford’s efforts are ready to be sung out over large speaker stacks instead of smaller indie rock clubs.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    “Closer I Get,” which features Oh, was co-written with Ivey and one that owes to the psychedelic trip. The sonics are less dense but the lyric is heavy. .... Act II: Mind Travel is mostly dark and perhaps most representative of the psilocybin effects. Analogies, metaphors and symbolism are rampant, albeit often subtle. .... Every trip, especially a six-day one like they took, has a distinct come down period. That’s the essence of Act III: Burn Whatever’s Left.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Be assured that Martin’s songs will grow on you. You may even take away a little more insight each time through.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    In stark contrast is the self-indulgent hero worship of “The One And Only (Van Dyke Parks).” However well-intentioned, the track is too cute by half, but its juxtaposition with the “Back In New York (Electric Mix)” redeems the conclusion of The Great Escape as crisp electric guitar figures echo through the jaunty tone of the Modrec Horns.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Black Pumas created a daring and enticing sophomore album that not only surpasses expectations but makes us feel silly for having any to begin with. .... These ten songs do more than avoid a sophomore slump, they cement Black Pumas as a creative force willing to risk it all if it means their vision comes to fruition uncompromised.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The band takes full advantage of their unpredictable reputation to craft an ambitious piece of art packed with enough personality and sparkle for it to be considered an undeniably fantastic release.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Action Adventure is a tidal wave of dense textures that wash over the listener for a full-sensory rollercoaster ride through the restless creativity of DJ Shadow.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Kills God Games is a step forward for the band, expanding their sound while retaining what makes them successful.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    History Books is a layered outing from Gaslight Anthem that is as familiar as it is refreshing. Longtime Gaslight Anthem fans will be pleased with the varying arrangements as the band traverses a colorful palette of moods and tones. Newcomers will be taken aback by the band’s unique diversity and lyrical dexterity as Gaslight Anthem pens gorgeous words to drive their latest outing.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    From a musical standpoint, it’s arguably overproduced in places, and the arc of the story settles into the same place in some of the two-three song sequences. Those quibbles aside, sonics usually match the thematic content which is stoked with bevies of provocative thought. Set aside the time to listen carefully; this is not casual stuff.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Auerbach and Finley stick closely to the format of Sharecropper’s Son – a mix of raw blues, gospel, soul, and funk. This one does feel a tad more personal and musically more on the swampy side, weighted that way by “Alligator Bait,” as memorable a story as you’ll hear, where Finley’s anger seeps through convincingly.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ozarker finds Nash tapping into an entirely different genre for inspiration and the result makes for one of his best albums so far. From the big guitars to the anthem-like choruses, Nash’s latest manages to update a sound that resonates both comfortably and refreshing at the same time.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Some of It Was True feels like a noteworthy stepping stone to the next era of The Menzingers with moments of moving songwriting and masterful musicianship that build on the ironclad legacy of one of Philadelphia’s greatest artistic offerings.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If you’re going to listen to one new release this week, make it Squirrel Flower’s Tomorrow’s Fire. Ella Willams crafted a meaningful album that showcases her limitless potential without disregarding the nuances of her artistry that make Squirrel Flower so unique and powerful.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Jonny is an album you need to listen to front-to-back in order to understand the full vision, nothing about this album should be skimmed over.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Javelin is a poignant snapshot of Stevens’s journey to this point in his career and pushes the boundaries of his art to their most jaw-dropping and potent. Javelin is another technicolored and honest feather in Sufjan Stevens’s hat, a feather that feels freeing and warm as the artist gives us some of his best work in years.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The NYC disco-pop outfit delivers a lot of grooving, dance-ready options.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Slow Pulp keeps those odd touches in place, scuffing up a very pretty album just enough to keep things interesting throughout Yard.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Pure energy, passion, and joy ring throughout, as “Elijah Rock” is one more case in point that shows that James Brandon Lewis can make a tribute album sound as original as possible.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sit Down for Dinner is an album you need to hear multiple times to understand the nuanced beauty of it all, allow Blonde Redhead to wash away the worries of reality and view these stressors through their technicolor, melodic lens.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Cousin is the band’s most avant-garde album in years, as Tweedy unleashes ten moving pieces of poetry set to unpredictable arrangements that all evoke the feeling of warmth despite their cold disposition.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Lydia Loveless’ Nothing’s Gonna Stand In My Way Again is a cathartic release without a strong resolution, as the journey is the focus, staying strong through heartbreak, mental stress, and much more.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On his fifth studio effort, Brent Cobb has never sounded more relaxed. And the calm, self-assured flow of his vocals is not particularly out of place for this always-on-the-cusp-of-making-it-big Americana artist, but there is a laid back flow to Southern Star that is hard to ignore and nearly impossible not to love.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    At this point in their over thirty-year career, Teenage Fanclub is confident in their mixture of light touches around an indie rock foundation and Nothing Lasts Forever continues them on their journey.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    In just two short years, Russell has emerged as one of our most important voices, and The Returner further projects her voice and career.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Art Dealers may just be his best album yet.