Glide Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 221 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 75% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 20% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 79
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 0 out of 221
221 music reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Wyatt seems to have lived a lifetime in the three years between Felony Blues and Neon Cross. The byproduct is a powerfully affecting album that can speak to just about anyone who’s willing to listen.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As the title suggests, Thompson reckons with the breakup of a real-life relationship but navigates it with an even-handed balance that’s part wistful and part deeply honest.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If you were a fan of their mid-2000’s work, this album would be a very satisfying continuation of their sound while also mixing in enough new ideas for it to be a progressive album for the group.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The distinctly raw sound is a cross between his usual folk-rock sound, and mountain music with generous hints of bluegrass, an area he explored earlier in his career.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Temple captures the band’s unique melding of styles: Asian with American, hip hop with rock, analog with digital, off-kilter with hummable. The band’s influences are combined not as a precise recipe, but as an experimental alchemy that rewards in unexpected ways.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The slow, contemplative songs on Set My Heart on Fire Immediately are hit or miss. Most are moving mood pieces with intricate melodies, while some are bland and skippable. The best Perfume Genius moments are with the dynamic upbeat pop songs, jam-packed with hooks and danceable grooves. Throughout the album, Hadreas forms complex sonic textures out of the thoughts tormenting his psyche. The result is an album that thrills at times, invites quiet reflection at others, but is always interesting.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Mael brothers have been waiting patiently for the world to catch up to them, but A Steady Drip, Drip, Drip signifies another bold creative peak moment for Sparks.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    His songs remain deeply personal, revisiting his drinking days and happy to be done with them in “It Gets Easier” and paying tribute to his wife, Amanda’s natural mothering instincts in “Letting You Go” yet there is not a song as impactful as “Cover Me Up” or “Elephant.” Nonetheless, his material is consistently strong enough to merit the four-bagger. Yes, four in a row equals a grand slam.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The piano-based songs carry elements of jazz and rock, with Kattner’s keen ear for sing-along melodies matched only by his desire to attack such melodies with unexpected bursts of bedlam. Those tumultuous bursts, occurring frequently and usually without warning, are part of what makes Dream Hunting in the Valley of the In-Between so exciting, with no dull moments even over 17 tracks of content.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    He puts his own spin on tracks with minimal brooding instrumentation, but he delivers for his idol in conventional fashion even adjusting his vocals to mimic Presley more than he normally would.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Twenty-five years into it, Jurado can still write compelling, emotionally powerful songs driven by little more than his commanding voice and a stripped down acoustic guitar. But the unevenness of this record makes it a hard entry point for those unfamiliar with his work. Longtime fans of Jurado can still find enough to rally behind this one.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    You don’t need to have read the book to appreciate the honesty of the album, which makes a compelling argument for Lanegan as a contemporary Lead Belly. ... The tracks aren’t designed to be ornate; they’re designed to support his lyrics. The result is a beautifully haunting journey.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Making A Door Less Open is a worthy addition to the creative evolution of Car Seat Headrest.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    LaFarge somehow manages to make the nostalgia sound authentic rather than gimmicky, which is quite an impressive feat.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Not surprisingly, this is as personal, maybe even more so, and autobiographical as any of her output. It’s not far removed from her excellent 2011 Revelation Road either. ... This recording is a huge reminder that Shelby Lynne is not only one of the most fiercely independent artists of our time. She’s clearly one of our best singers too.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Rose is pushing the envelope a bit on this outing. Sometimes it seems as if she’s trying to break through a sound that was bigger than she bargained for but there are still those precious moments where her voice and phrasing may have you reminiscing of classic singers like Bobbie Gentry and Dusty Springfield. That’s mixed with a swagger, self-confidence, and a willingness to rock out.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Shooting for the sweet spot of artists like Radiohead and The National, Other Lives embraces their tense, dramatic, theatrical, orchestral sound, and scope on For [Their] Love.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Overall Benson has crafted an enjoyable, thoughtful slice of pop-rock on Dear Life, embracing his classic rock love while not limiting the scope of his sound and voice.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Diabate and Fleck, though, are considered the prime masters of their respective instruments so their set is especially impressive.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There are songs where she’s smoothed out the edges somewhat. That, with the raw instrumentation framing it, makes this one of her stronger vocal outings.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Brother Sister feels bigger than just the siblings, but it is essentially a gentle folk record with lovely instrumentation and gorgeous harmonies. With Sean primarily on guitar and Sara on fiddle, and both sharing vocals, the sound comes across at times like a full band but it’s usually just the two of them making stirring music.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Cadillac Three’s Country Fuzz precisely captures the delightfully ragged album, which soaks a straight-forward country in a tub full of distortion, creating music that will delight metal heads and line dancers, both groups previously only in agreement over the appropriateness of mullets.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Fiona Apple’s Fetch The Bolt Cutters is a triumphant and very well-timed return after an eight-year hiatus. Apple’s fifth album, an introspective, 13 song journey defies genre. ... Fetch The Bolt Cutters takes many exciting turns. The album exudes freedom, it exudes breaking constraints, it exudes Fiona Apple, and it might just be the album that we look back on when we think back to this COVID-19 era.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Although some fans may be disappointed not to hear the same early aughts NYC sound, discerning listeners will find that consistency as well as hopefully appreciate a new direction for a band with much acclaim.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    An extremely cerebral approach to experimental music, which tend to feel more disjointed. Every movement has a purpose and every song on the album combines to make a fantastic album.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Migration Stories is a bright sounding album that draws on Ward’s skills in creating a warm and beaming atmosphere, even if the lyrics are the direct opposite. Gentle songs and tender vocals transport the listener to a world where anything is possible. While the production of the album might sound a bit more polished than past releases, it is still unmistakably M. Ward’s sound and bound to be a favorite with fans.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This third CATS album is wholly in keeping with the growing confidence of the band (in contrast to the somewhat laissez-faire sophomore outing, appropriately titled Let It Wander) as well as the creative progression of its forebears.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The weight of loss, the pain of failed love, the bleakness of it all, combined with Thundercats effervescent playing, unique playfulness and a giddy sense of humor combine on It Is What It Is, resulting in the best album of Brunner’s career and one of the strongest of 2020.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is a leap forward for Hiatt who delivers her most fully realized album yet.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If you’re looking for fast, lighthearted punk music in the Buzzcocks vein, look no further. With their smashing drums and Zulu Robson-esque snarl to Sandwith’s voice, The Chats suberbly capture their day-to-day life in Australia as the true inspiration for their work. The ability to translate their influence and perspective makes them a much more accessible band than most.